Student Organizations and Institutional Diversity Efforts: A Typology

By Kuk, Linda; Banning, James | College Student Journal, June 2010 | Go to article overview

Student Organizations and Institutional Diversity Efforts: A Typology


Kuk, Linda, Banning, James, College Student Journal


American higher education has become focused on increasing access and success for traditionally underrepresented populations. Despite the myriad of institutional efforts, attention has not been given to the role of student organizations in supporting these efforts. This article looks at the role campus student organizations can play within campus diversity efforts and presents a typology for understanding campus organizations' diversity activities. This typology will aid in organizational self-understanding and in promoting student organizations to become more inclusive of campus diversity efforts.

Campus Climate, Diversity and Student Organizations

Research has indicated that the campus climate fostered through both the curriculum and co-curricular life of the campus play a key role in supporting student success and student college persistence (Astin, 1984, 1993; Pascarella & Terenzini, 2005; Tinto, 1993). Yet many traditional college campuses and their surrounding communities continue to be perceived as unwelcoming, or at best, neutral to the presence of diverse students (Brown, 1991 ; Mallory, 1997; Person & Christensen, 1996; Sutton & Kimbrough, 2001). Levine and Cureton (1998) suggest that multiculturalism remains the most unresolved issue on today's college campuses. Many would argue that the context of the college experience, the campus climate, has much to do with both the quality of the experience and persistence to graduation.

In recent years, campuses have devoted significant resources to addressing campus climate efforts to enhance diversity. They have created special recruiting initiatives, fostered the development of multicultural services and retention programs, developed curriculum integration efforts, and structured multicultural competency training for faculty, staff and student leaders. Often overlooked in these efforts, however, has been the role of campus student organizations. This is surprising in that student organizations have the potential to serve as significant agents to advance the multicultural and diversity goals of college campuses. Campus student organizations serve as significant social networks for students on college campuses and serve as important links for students to campus life and to the institution. They have also been found to be important components of student involvement and contribute to student learning, student development and student success (Pascarella & Terenzini, 2005). For diverse students these groups are often the life line to college persistence and connection (Cheng & Zhao, 2006; Mallory, 1997; McRee & Cooper, 1998; Rooney, 1985; Sutton & Kimbrough, 2001; Sutton & Terrell, 1997). Despite the documented importance of student organizations, the relationship between these organizations and institutional diversity efforts remains unexplored. The following is a typology for guiding student organizations through an assessment of their current involvement with diversity related goals and strategies within their campus environments.

The Student Organization Diversity Typology

The goals and behavior of campus student organizations can promote or hinder the institution's efforts toward increasing the admission of diverse students on campus as well as their feelings of belonging and persistence once on campus. This typology presents a way to view and understand the relationship between student organizations and their organizational behavior toward campus diversity goals and issues. The diversity typology outlines the possible relationships between a student organization and the campus's institutional diversity efforts. Understanding this relationship has two purposes: (a) by naming the relationship between the two entities a clearer understanding about the nature of the relationship is possible, in other words, the relationship can be conceptualized and discussed, and (b) the typology is presented in a hierarchical format from most negative to most positive--this provides both the student organizations and those who work with these organizations a road map to relationships that can increase their support of and involvement in institutional diversity goals. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Student Organizations and Institutional Diversity Efforts: A Typology
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.