Would-Be King; Stephen King's Son Is Now at a Crossroads Leading to What Could Be Literary Greatness, Writes Lorne Jackson

The Birmingham Post (England), June 10, 2010 | Go to article overview

Would-Be King; Stephen King's Son Is Now at a Crossroads Leading to What Could Be Literary Greatness, Writes Lorne Jackson


Byline: Lorne Jackson

ill 9)We live in an era when pampered poppets prosper. The new man at Number 10 is an Old Etonian, while his deputy swaggered out of er, a school also founded by the r their own advancement. Cameron later joined the bully he Bullington Club, a snobbish drinking society for young who are as cocksure as they onnected.

ck Clegg, meanwhile, eased his ay into power by accepting the atronage of powerful sugar daddies in Europe.

So much for the egalitarian society.

It isn't just in politics that Britain fails to be a progressive nation where merit, endeavour and hard work are rewarded.

In the media, nepotism has the kind of stranglehold previously only known to the custodians of Buckingham Palace. Then there's literature... Quite a few sons and daughter of famous authors have popped up over the years, proudly sporting their own verion of the book writer's badge. Thankfully most of the exams I can think of also exhibited ary talent, just like mummy or ather of Martin Amis was, of ooker Prize winner and Lucky Kingsley Amis.

ke Amis Jnr a Lucky Martin? wever, it's hard to grudge Amis cess. His dad may have been in Martin is also a very talented thor who joined the family firm, is Fay Kellerman, wife of bestr Jonathan Kellerman. Jesse, is now making a name for himself in the same genre as mum and dad, crime fiction.

John Le Carr has a son who writes. Though Nick Harkaway didn't follow pops into the world of espionage. Instead, he has dipped his fingers into the bubbling cauldron of fantasy.

Though when it comes to tales of the fantastic, Nick has a few miles to plod before he is in the same league as Stephen King.

Talking of King, he also has a couple of sons who are professional writers.

I've interviewed one of them, Joe Hill, who was a likeable chap, and very modest.

Joe was quick to concede he'd never be as famous or successful as dad.

Although he wrote horror fiction - like the old man - he refused to exploit his father's reputation to gain that first faltering foothold on Liter-r ary Mountain.

He chose not to use the King monicker, and when he first started to send out submissions of his work, editors had no idea that he was the son of someone famous in the field.

I liked Joe Hill a lot. Even better, I liked his fiction.

Stephen's son might have been modest about his expectations, but I sensed that given application, he could, one day, eclipse dad.

His first novel, Heart-Shaped Box, had an intriguing premise: a bloke buys a ghost on the internet.

The novel was well-paced, packed with narrative twists and turns, and didn't rely solely on that first clever idea.

Even better was 20th Century Ghosts, the best collection of tales, in any genre, that I'd read in quite some time. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Would-Be King; Stephen King's Son Is Now at a Crossroads Leading to What Could Be Literary Greatness, Writes Lorne Jackson
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.