The Last Word

By Vesely, Milan | The Middle East, June 2010 | Go to article overview

The Last Word


Vesely, Milan, The Middle East


[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

MUCH HAS BEEN WRITTEN ABOUT THE Times Square, New York City, bomber Faisal Shahzad, the majority questioning how such a westernised, American-Pakistani could even contemplate such a despicable act. "He was just like us," one of his friends is reported to have said. Much has also been written about his incompetence in building the Nissan Pathfinder SUV car bomb, the majority scathingly decrying the ability of his alleged Pakistani Taliban trainers to impart even the most rudimentary bomb-making ability to a well-educated and technically savvy individual, certainly one who appears at first glance to be able to assimilate complicated procedures.

One issue, however, has become crystal clear. The techniques formerly used by terrorist bomb makers are history, the way they are now approaching their nefarious craft completely turning US law enforcement procedures on their head.

No longer relying on their recruits' ability to steal dynamite from quarries, or even to build bombs from nitrogen and ammonia-based fertilisers such as those used by American terrorist Timothy McVeigh in the Oklahoma bombing, the Taliban bomb instructors have instead turned to developing lethal combinations through the use of everyday materials, such items as propane gas cylinders used for barbecues, and gasoline, easily purchased at any street-corner gas station, items so readily available that they raise not an iota of suspicion. Such was the material used in Faisal Shahzad's potentially lethal car bomb. And as to the purchase of the Nissan Pathfinder vehicle itself, that was bought through one of the myriad Internet sales outlets, often used by shady sellers demanding cash in return for a 'no questions asked' exchange.

Also mentioned in the many reports describing the efforts of Faisal Shahzad is the use of the commonly obtained fireworks, which proved ineffective as detonator material. These were of the M-88 miniature explosion type that usually form the backdrop to the many displays set up in towns and cities across the US during the nation's Fourth of July or Labour Day celebrations. That these failed to ignite the gasoline and propane gas cylinders was not due to Mr Shahzad's incompetence, or even to the inability of his alleged Pakistani Taliban trainers to understand their hideous trade craft, but simply to a quirk of consumer protection law in the US. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

The Last Word
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.