Market Saved as Judge Rules Demolition Could Damage Race Relations

The Evening Standard (London, England), June 23, 2010 | Go to article overview

Market Saved as Judge Rules Demolition Could Damage Race Relations


Byline: Martin Bentham Home Affairs Editor

CAMPAIGNERS fighting plans to demolish a local market for "yuppie flats" and a shopping complex have won a landmark legal victory after a judge ruled that race relations might be damaged.

Haringey council had given permission to a developer to knock down an indoor market, shops and homes at Wards Corner, above Seven Sisters Tube station, to build flats and shops.

Opponents warned that the scheme would see the disappearance of the market's Latin American stalls and affect hundreds of black and ethnic minority residents who live there.

Their claims have now been backed by the Court of Appeal after judges decided that the council had broken the law by failing to consider the scheme's impact upon different racial groups and the relations between them.

Giving the judgment, Lord Justice Pill said: "On the material before the council, there was sufficient potential impact on equality of opportunity between persons of different racial groups, and on good relations between such groups, to require that the impact of the decision on those aspects of social and economic life be considered. …

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Market Saved as Judge Rules Demolition Could Damage Race Relations
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