India Industrialization Stalls; Farmers, Villagers Fight Factory's Land-Acquisition Efforts with Violence

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), June 25, 2010 | Go to article overview

India Industrialization Stalls; Farmers, Villagers Fight Factory's Land-Acquisition Efforts with Violence


Byline: Sujoy Dhar, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

NEW DELHI -- A recently deserted car factory in Singur in the communist-run state of West Bengal offers mute testimony of heavy industry's ongoing struggle to acquire land in India.

The factory was to have been the home of Tata Motors' Nano, billed as the world's cheapest car, and was to have transformed the semi-rural suburb around it into a bustling township. Tata announced its plans to much fanfare in 2008.

But more than two years of protests by farmers and villagers over land acquisition forced India's third-largest automaker to move its operations to a new plant in the western state of Gujarat and abandon its $350 million factory in Singur.

Now Tata Steel, the world's eighth-largest steelmaker, is fighting a similar, if embarrassing, battle to construct a plant at Kalinganagar in the eastern state of Orissa.

As India tries to woo foreign investors and burnish its standing as Asia's third-largest economy, its industrial endeavors face resistance, mostly from villagers reluctant to part with land their families have tilled for decades.

Current delays in land acquisition for industrial projects threaten to sink investments worth $100 billion to India in the near term, according to a recent study by the Associated Chambers of Commerce and Industry of India, one of the country's largest business groups.

The study noted an assessment released by the Indian Steel Ministry stating that 22 major steel projects worth $82 billion are being held up by public protests over land acquisition and red tape in securing environmental-impact clearances, among other reasons.

The Associated Chambers of Commerce and Industry says problems in acquiring land for industrial projects has tarnished the image of several Indian states as business-friendly locations.

India's Land Acquisition Act of 1894 allows the government to claim land for public use, such as for roads, railways and parks. Enacted during British rule of India, the act is murky on issues of claiming land for private industry.

Governments in some Indian states have tried to cite the act to set aside land for industry, with varying results.

Claiming that Tata Motors' use of the site in Singur was in the public interest, the communist government of West Bengal tried to acquire fertile farmlands by force for the Tata project in Singur in 2006.

The land-grab attempt was met with violence from villagers, who also revolted against government plans to construct a chemical factory in nearby Nandigram. Villagers dug up roads and threw trees on the communists, bellowing a war cry against land acquisition. …

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