Winning Creativity: Leadership Competency

Manila Bulletin, June 26, 2010 | Go to article overview

Winning Creativity: Leadership Competency


In a recent survey conducted by the Institute of Business Management (IBM) Institute for Business Value, creativity emerged as the leadership competency that chief executives value most, especially as global complexity has emerged as the major issue confronting chief executive officers (CEOs) and their enterprises.Recent events in the global arena, especially the worldwide financial turmoil that caused the downfall of many big and established names in manufacturing industries and the financial market, have challenged the soundness of the historical assumptions and future projections made by top-level men and women who were in charge.Many of them have come to realize that their theories and the mechanisms they have put in place can be shaken by factors beyond the periphery of their enterprises by phenomena affecting the entire planet - climate change and the dynamics between natural events and the supply chains for raw materials, food items, and human resources.Scientific, socio-economic, and political studies of recent decades have shown the interconnectedness and interdependency of economic, social, and political systems. This has led chief executives to acknowledge that only "fresh thinking and continuous innovation at all the levels of the organization" can help reverse the trend of a possible downfall. "CEOs have seized upon creativity as the necessary element for enterprises that must reinvent their customer relationships and achieve greater operational dexterity."Interviews with business consultants and CEOs yielded a very significant finding - the need for "creative disruption. …

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Winning Creativity: Leadership Competency
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