Kagan Stands Ground, Stresses 'Impartiality'; Republicans Cite 'Liberal' Positions

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), June 29, 2010 | Go to article overview

Kagan Stands Ground, Stresses 'Impartiality'; Republicans Cite 'Liberal' Positions


Byline: Sean Lengell, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Supreme Court nominee Elena Kagan on Monday pushed back at Republican accusations that she is liberal ideologue, telling Congress that if confirmed she would consider every case impartially, modestly and in accordance of the law.

Ms. Kagan, while addressing the Senate Judiciary Committee in the first day of what was expected to be a weeklong hearing, stressed that she would take an even-handed approach and would consider all sides of an argument if confirmed. Her almost 13-minute speech was peppered with such words and phrases as restraint, "open minded " principl "and"impartiality."

Ms. Kagan, 50, is the first woman to hold the post of U.S. solicitor general, the federal government's top litigator before the Supreme Court. She also was the first woman to serve as dean of Harvard Law School, and she served as an adviser in the Clinton administration.

She said her experience as an educator, in government and the private sector would serve her well serving on the nation's highest court.

The Supreme Court is a wondrous institution. But the time I spent in the other branches of government remind me that it must also be a modest one - properly deferential to the decisions of the American people and their elected representatives, she said.

Ms. Kagan, dressed in a blue suit similar to one worn by fellow Obama administration Supreme Court nominee Sonia Sotomayor, who was confirmed last year, touted the retiring Justice John Paul Stevens, who she would replace if confirmed.

His integrity, humility and independence, his deep devotion to the court, and his profound commitment to the rule of law - all these qualities are models for everyone who wears, or hopes to wear, a judge's robe, she said.

She also praised the courts' first two female justices, Sandra Day O'Connor and Ruth Bader Ginsburg, saying that they paved the way for me and so many other women in my generation.

Elena Kagan earned her place at the top of the legal profession. Her legal qualifications are unassailable, said committee Chairman Patrick J. Leahy, Vermont Democrat.

But Republicans portrayed her as a political lawyer who has associations with activist judges.

A review of the material produced by the Clinton Library shows that you forcefully promoted liberal positions and offered analyses and recommendations that often were more political than legal, said Sen. Charles E. Grassley, Iowa Republican.

Sen. Jeff Sessions of Alabama, the committee's ranking Republican, expressed uneasiness that Ms. Kagan never has tried a case before a jury and only argued her first appellate case a few months ago.

While academia certainly has value, there is no substitute, I think, for being in the harness of the law, handling real cases over a period of years, he said. …

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