Sites for Summer Browsing

By Troutner, Joanne | Teacher Librarian, June 2010 | Go to article overview

Sites for Summer Browsing


Troutner, Joanne, Teacher Librarian


As most of us ask, "Where did the school year go?" Last year I was just as surprised as I am now when the deadline for this June issue came around.

I can hardly believe it is time again to write the column that traditionally has been filled with items for the teacher-librarian's professional development as well as tools to help your fellow educators.

Despite the fact that time caught up with me, I was able to gather several great options for staying up-to-date with the ever changing technology world as well as some good sites that will help in various curriculum areas. As you enjoy the more leisurely pace of summer, also explore and develop that plan to share your great finds with colleagues!

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Start by taking the quiz at the Pew Research Center to help you find out just how much you are like the "millennial" students who visit your library. Housed at http ://pewresearch.org/millennials/quiz/index.php, this 14 question quiz may open your eyes. After finding your score, take time to explore the Topic Index and browse the information on the Millennials. Information gathered by the Pew Research projects brings to life the students we are educating every day. Look at the Internet & Technology section as well. Finally, explore the "Interactive" options. See what you might recommend to colleagues for use in their classroom.

Another quick way to stay on top of technology is Tammy Worcester's Tech Tip of the Week available at http://www.tammyworcester.com/TipOfWeek/TammyWTechTipOfWeek/Tech_Tip of Week_Tammy_Worcester.html. Recent selections deal with using Google Docs to create self checking quizzes and creating a domain name for student e-mail accounts, to a wide range of ideas for using Ooogle Maps. You can subscribe to Tammy's weekly newsletter via RSS feed or e-mail. Of course, you will also want to spend some time exploring Tammy's presentation handouts, the "Ideas & Activities" tab, and her Internet Resources. You are guaranteed to gather some great ideas as well as spending a worthwhile afternoon at the computer!

If you have not yet explored Diigo as a collaboration tool for your colleagues, now is the time. Peruse the blog entry at http://blog.learningtoday.com/blog/bid/2605/ Exploratoryand-Collaborative-Learning-with-Diigo for some well crafted beginning tips. Then think about setting up an account and list for your colleagues to showcase the gems you find this summer during your explorations. The ability to add annotations, create groups, and easily share resources makes this tool at true find! And, consider the 21st century skills your staff and learners will gain when using such a tool.

As we move further into using Web 2.0 tools for assessment, project based learning, and just an everyday part of our instructional lives, the issue of scoring student creations and projects arises. Here are a few options for finding rubrics to use and]or modify as you and your colleagues continue adding these tools to your teaching toolkit. Begin by looking at the well crafted materials available at Kathy Schrock's site, http://school.discoveryeducation.com/schrockguide/assess.html. Then look at the Web 2.0 options for items on Animoto, Glogster, Voicethread, and more. Another good starting point is Andrew Churches' wiki, http://edorigami.wikispaees.com/, which includes rubrics on bookmarking, podeasting, using Skype, Google Maps, data analysis, and more. Scroll down to the "Other Bloom's Digital Taxonomy Resources" section to find this treasure-trove. One last place to explore is the rubric on blogging found at http://thereadingworkshop.wikispaees.com/Blog+Comment+Rubrie; it provides a great start for those using blogs with students.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Investigate the wide range of materials available via the Internet publishing site, Lulu. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Sites for Summer Browsing
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.