New Ross -a Legendary Welcome Awaits You; ADVERTISING FEATURE

The Mail on Sunday (London, England), July 11, 2010 | Go to article overview

New Ross -a Legendary Welcome Awaits You; ADVERTISING FEATURE


Once described as 'The Norman Gateway to the Barrow Valley', New Ross is a thriving town set in rich rolling countryside of County Wexford on the mouth of the River Barrow. There is a variety of visitor centres, activities and leisurely pursuits to be enjoyed and an excellent choice of accommodation, restaurants and shops in which to savour some local Wexford hospitality.

The story of New Ross and its surrounding town lands can be explored at its visitor centres, from the Norman tales displayed in the fifteen tapestries of the Ros Tapestry, to the story of emigration during the Great Famine onboard the Dunbrody Famine Ship and the more recent history at the ancestral birthplace of John F. Kennedy, the 35th President of the United States of America.

Docked on the quayside in New Ross is the Dunbrody Famine Ship, a replica ship of the original 19th Century three masted sailing ship that brought many emigrants from Ireland to North America during and after the Great Famine. In 2005, the Dunbrody made her Maiden Voyage when she along with the Asgard II and the Jeanie Johnston lead the Tall Ships of the World out of Waterford Harbour in the Tall Ships Race 2005. This was the first and only time when the three Irish Tall Ships sailed together.

The visitor experience of the Dunbrody provides a unique insight into a period of history that shaped both modern day Ireland and North America. All visitors are issued a ticket from the 19th Century and as you explore the ship you'll encounter some of the emigrants who'll share their stories with you.

Just across the road is the latest attraction to New Ross, the Ros Tapestry. This unique attraction opened in April 2009 and comprises fifteen tapestries depicting the Norman arrival to the South East of Ireland. Not only do you hear the story of that each tapestry depicts but you also get an insight into the work that went into these magnificent pieces of craftsmanship. Over a hundred embroiders and millions of stitches have drawn in the threads of history in these embroidered panels, which stand at 6x4 foot each.

The Ros Tapestry is the result of a massive community initiative in county Wexford. The original idea was conceived in 1998 and ten years of work undertaken by the dedicated volunteers has developed to the wonderful tapestries on display today. The hours of stitching fitted into the lives of the volunteers and you can view a tapestry in the making first hand. It certainly is an experience to be treasured.

Life-sized statue of John F Kennedy

The ancestral birthplace of John F Kennedy, 35th President of the United States of America can be visited at the Kennedy homestead, where five generations of the Kennedy clan are celebrated. A life sized statue of John F. Kennedy has recently been unveiled on the quayside in New Ross.

Some 12kms south of New Ross is the JFK Arboretum located just outside the town. …

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