Psychometrics Is Rewarding

Cape Times (South Africa), July 19, 2010 | Go to article overview

Psychometrics Is Rewarding


What does your job entail? The main focus of psychometry is administering and scoring psychometric assessments and writing reports on the results, however, my role as psychometrist has enabled me to gain experience beyond psychometrics.

I've taken part in projects that included climate surveys, position profiling and competency-based interviewing. I also pair my theoretical knowledge with practical introductions to job grading and organisational design, while getting to know the dynamics of business through different HR processes.

In the business development part of my role I do informal market research, meet people and get involved in strategic relationship building and management.

Average work day: Depending on the project at hand, a typical day would include welcoming candidates and guiding them and answering questions. I then administer the assessments and, after they are completed, I score them and generate the candidates' results, which are integrated into written reports.

An average day also includes a variety of administrative and ad hoc tasks, liaising with clients and marketing activities.

Best part of the job: I enjoy having the opportunity to freely give my input and generate ideas; stimulating creative thinking and continually expanding my knowledge and experience. Job satisfaction is a major benefit and I love the flexibility and interpersonal interaction.

Worst part of the job: The worst part is the inconsistency of the workload and the travelling. …

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