Mix and Match: Entrepreneurs Find the Right Combination to Move Their Hair Products Forward

By Holmes, Tamara E. | Black Enterprise, July 2010 | Go to article overview

Mix and Match: Entrepreneurs Find the Right Combination to Move Their Hair Products Forward


Holmes, Tamara E., Black Enterprise


AS BIRACIAL WOMEN, WENDI LEVY and Kim Etheredge couldn't find haircare products for their curly hair texture. "[At the time] there really was not a product on the market for our specific hair type--combination hair," says Etheredge.

Tired of mixing and matching products, the two friends in 2004 launched MIXED CHICKS (www.mixedchicks.net; 818-888-4008), a Canoga Park, California, company that serves up haircare products for multicultural women and men. And with the number of bi- and multiracial people in the United States at 6.5 million and growing, MIXED CHICKS is ready to serve them and others. Their products are currently sold in nearly 1,000 beauty supply stores and salons in the U.S. and abroad, and the company grossed $3.5 million in revenues in 2009. With an all-natural children's line coming out at the end of the summer, MIXED CHICKS stands poised to double that amount in 2010.

But the road was rough initially. When Levy, 41, and Etheredge, 39, started the company, both still worked full time as a teacher and public relations executive, respectively. Levy worked with Etheredge's sister, who introduced the two. Both biracial (Etheredge's mother is Irish and her father is black American; Levy's mother is black American and her father is Jewish), the two became friends, and eventually the business venture was born. Their day jobs funded the business, giving them a budget of about $10,000 to spend on product ingredients, laboratory time, and marketing materials. But when it was time to purchase product packaging, their funds came up short.

"We had a specific bottle that we liked," says Etheredge. "Most bottles are usually round or oval. We liked this square bottle. It just wasn't something that you saw on the shelves every day." However, that uniqueness made the bottles more difficult to find. There were manufacturers that had extra round bottles to sell in small denominations, but when it came to the less common square bottle, "most companies didn't want to deal with you unless you were going to order 50,000 units," Levy recalls. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Mix and Match: Entrepreneurs Find the Right Combination to Move Their Hair Products Forward
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.