Changing Course: If You Never Take Time to Assess Where You Are versus Where You Really Want to Be, You Could Be Missing out. Regain Your Bearings and Get on Course for Your Most Fulfilling Life

By Estrem, Pauline | Success, August 2010 | Go to article overview

Changing Course: If You Never Take Time to Assess Where You Are versus Where You Really Want to Be, You Could Be Missing out. Regain Your Bearings and Get on Course for Your Most Fulfilling Life


Estrem, Pauline, Success


As you make your way on your life's journey, it's easy to unwittingly veer off course, not realizing the goals you once had don't seem worthwhile anymore. But you don't need to wait for some dramatic occurrence to force a reinvention. And you don't have to wait--period. In fact, experts say it's important to stop periodically, assess where you're going and whether that destination remains worthwhile, and to make course adjustments as you determine they are needed.

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John C. Maxwell, leadership expert and best-selling author, spends two weeks each December doing just that. "I review the previous year's schedule. I look at my upcoming commitments. I evaluate my family life. I think about my goals. I look at the big picture of what I'm doing to make sure the way I'm living lines up with my values and priorities."

Brian Tracy, author of the recent Reinvention: How to Make the Rest of Your Life the Best of Your Life, says there are seven areas in life that we should periodically assess: career, family and relationships, health, finances, education/knowledge, community involvement and spiritual development.

"Imagine that your life was ideal in every sense, in each area," he says. "If it was perfect, what would it look like and how would it be different from today? And then what would you have to do starting today to create that ideal life sometime in the future?"

Life coach Caroline Adams Miller, co-author of Creating Your Best Life, published in 2009, recommends asking yourself what you want more of and what you want less of. She suggests doing the "Magic Wand" exercise, asking yourself what your life would look like in 10 years if everything had gone as well as possible, considering such things as what you would be doing, where you'd be living, who your friends would be, what you'd be wearing, and what would have changed most between then and now. …

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