Have You Got Gymnophobia? That's a Fear of Nudity - and One of Our Top Ten Most Bizarre Phobias, According to a Fascinating New Website

Daily Mail (London), July 26, 2010 | Go to article overview

Have You Got Gymnophobia? That's a Fear of Nudity - and One of Our Top Ten Most Bizarre Phobias, According to a Fascinating New Website


Byline: CLAIRE COHEN

WHAT are the worst film sequels ever made? Or the nastiest way you could be killed by an animal? Well, listverse.com will answer these questions and more. It gives top ten lists for everything -- however bizarre.

TEN BIZARRE PHOBIAS

1. EPHEBOPHOBIA. Fear of youths

2. COULROPHOBIA. Fear of clowns

3. ARACHIBUTYROPHOBIA. Fear of peanut butter sticking to the roof of your mouth

4. GYMNOPHOBIA. Fear of nudity

5. PENTHERAPHOBIA. Fear of your mother-in-law

6. DEIPNOPHOBIA. Fear of dinner conversation

7. PANPHOBIA. Fear of everything 8. TAPHOPHOBIA. Fear of being buried alive 9. PTERONOPHOBIA. Fear of being tickled with feathers

10. AUTOMATONOPHOBIA. Fear of a ventriloquist's dummy

AND THEIR REAL NAMES 1. AGLET. The piece of plastic covering the ends of your shoelace.

2. ZARF. A coffee holder with a handle, which stops you burning your hands on the cup.

3. DINGBAT. Characters that aren't letters or punctuation, for instance a pound sign or per cent symbol -- usually used in groups to indicate an expletive. 4. FERRULE. The band that connects the rubber to the end of the pencil.

5. KEEPER. The loop in your belt strap that keeps the end in place after it has been fastened through the buckle.

6. KERF. The groove made by a saw. 7. PUNT. The indentation at the bottom of a wine bottle.

8. PHILTRUM. The vertical groove between your lip and nose. 9. PHOSPHENES. The points of light you see behind your eyelids when you shut your eyes hard.

10. TRAGUS. The piece of cartilage that sticks out at the front side of your ear and points backwards.

TEN FUNNY EXAM ANSWERS

1. Solomom had 300 wives and 700 porcupines.

2. The Greeks were a highly sculptured people, and without them we wouldn't have history. The Greeks also had myths. A myth is a female moth.

3. Ancient Egypt was inhabited by mummies and they all wrote in hydraulics.

4. Joan of Arc was burnt to a steak and was canonised by Bernard Shaw.

5. Queen Victoria was the longest queen. She sat on a thorn for 63 years.

6. In midevil times, most people were alliterate.

7. Charles Darwin was a naturalist who wrote the Organ Of The Species.

8. Nero was a cruel tyranny who would torture his subjects by playing the fiddle to them.

9. The sun never set on the British Empire because the British Empire is in the East and the sun sets in the West.

10. Gravity was invented by Issac Walton. It is chiefly noticeable in the autumn when the apples are falling off the trees.

TEN GRUESOME METHODS OF EXECUTION

\

1. SAWING. The criminal would be hung upside-down and a saw would be used to cut their body in half -- starting with the groin.

2. SCAPHISM. An ancient Persian method of execution. A naked person would be placed inside a hollow tree trunk, their head, hands, and feet protruding. Honey would be rubbed on his body to attract insects. They would then be abandoned. Eventual death was probably due to a combination of dehydration, starvation and septic shock from the bites.

3. SNAKE PIT. One of the oldest forms of execution. Convicts were cast into a deep pit with venomous snakes. Several famous leaders have been said to die this way, including Ragnar Lodbrok, a Viking warlord in the 9th century. 4. FLAYING. An ancient method where the skin of the criminal is removed from their body with a very sharp knife.

5. BOILING. The condemned was placed in a vat of boiling liquid, or of cold liquid which was then heated to boiling. This could be oil, acid, tar, water or lead.

6. BREAKING WHEEL. The criminal would be attached to a cart wheel. The wheel would be made to turn while a hammer delivered blows. Death could take days. 7. LING CHI. Practised in China until 1905. …

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