Assessment in the Classroom. (Primary and Secondary)

By Heffer, Jo | NATE Classroom, Summer 2010 | Go to article overview

Assessment in the Classroom. (Primary and Secondary)


Heffer, Jo, NATE Classroom


Assessment is a hot topic at the moment and with the introduction of APP in speaking and listening joining what is already in place for reading and writing, everyone seems to be talking about it. What should assessment look like in the classroom, though? Teachit Primary has some exciting teaching resources that will help to support and embed the assessment process.

Firstly, Let's talk about reading has a handy series of questions which will prompt children to think carefully about what they've read and which can be used with both fiction and non-fiction texts. The questions are shown as thought bubbles on cards which can be cut up and laminated. The questions are far reaching and will help children to reflect on the organisation of texts (AF4), writers' uses of language (AF5) and writers' purposes and viewpoints (AF6), as well as the literal and inferential retrieval of information. There is a versatility with these cards too as they can be used in small groups or with individuals for peer assessment.

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Another useful resource that will support reading assessment is What kind of person is Lila? It's based on The Firework Maker's Daughter by Phillip Pullman but could easily be adapted for other novels. Readers have to find incidents in the text to back up their interpretation of the main character. For nonfiction assessment, Elephant report writing provides great opportunities to assess pupils' understanding with a number of activities that get readers thinking about structure, purpose and audience.

For speaking and listening we need to be assessing how pupils talk to others, talk with others, talk within role play and drama and talk about talk. The resource Speaking and listening ideas provides a wealth of activities. I particularly like 'Now who is the teacher?' where pupils have to provide short talks or presentations on a Friday based on what their teacher has taught them throughout the week. …

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