When the Facts Get in the Way

By Meacham, Jon | Newsweek, August 2, 2010 | Go to article overview

When the Facts Get in the Way


Meacham, Jon, Newsweek


Byline: Jon Meacham

My family and I have spent most of July in Tennessee, which has put me in the position of being in touch with but not obsessed by the news cycle. (Though there is not really a cycle to news anymore. It is more of a treadmill.) My first glimmer of things comes from my e-mail, with its news alerts, and last week, inevitably, I found myself following the strange saga of Shirley Sherrod, a hitherto unknown employee of the Department of Agriculture.

You know the story by now. A conservative Web site posted a misleading excerpt of remarks Sherrod made to a meeting of the Georgia NAACP earlier this year. The video was edited to suggest that Sherrod, who is African-American, had discriminated against a white farmer back in 1986. The moment of purported reverse racism roared around the Internet, onto Fox News, and into the mainstream media.

There was one problem, however: the story was not true. Sherrod had been sharing an account of redemption, telling her audience how she had overcome racism (in 1965 her father was killed by a white man; an all-white grand jury refused to return an indictment). The white family under discussion said Sherrod was instrumental in helping them keep their farm; they were perplexed by allegations that she had been racist.

Yet the frenetic way we live now meant that facts would not be allowed to get in the way of a hectic rush to judgment. The Obama administration--Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack took full responsibility--did what it says it does not do, which is cave to the cable gods of the moment. It was yet another object lesson in the perils of life in a hyperpartisan and hyperactive media climate, an ethos that encourages hyperbole and haste. And one thing is certain: Sherrod's case, which illustrates both the seasonal and structural realities of the current era, will not be the last such gloomy hour for the political class.

The seasonal issue is one particular to the age of Obama, if universal to American politics: the underlying role that white prejudice against blacks plays in our national life. The Sherrod video was posted in order to execute a bit of sulfurous jujitsu. See, the right wing was saying, they really are after us. Look what happens if you let them have power: they screw us. A difficult but inescapable irony is at work for President Obama. As he continues to win legislative battles, he will face an ever more irrational and radical opposition. …

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