Milestones We Can Be Proud Of

Anglican Journal, May 2010 | Go to article overview

Milestones We Can Be Proud Of


1875

An English bookkeeper, Frank Wootten, buys the Church Herald and renames it Dominion Churchman. An annual subscription to the weekly publication costs $2.

1890

The Rev. William Clarke, a professor at Toronto's Trinity College, becomes editor. The publication is renamed Canadian Churchman. Wootten keeps proprietorship.

1912

Wootten dies and a group of evangelical Anglicans forms a holding company to purchase the Canadian Churchman. For the next 10 years, it is associated with Wycliffe College in Toronto.

1926

Clara Mclntyre succeeds her late husband, the Rev. E.A. Mclntyre, to become the first female editor of the Churchman, a position she holds until 1944. Readers are unaware of her gender.

1948

The Anglican Church of Canada's General Board of Religious Education takes over as publisher. Circulation is about 5,000.

1957

A recommendation is made to the church's executive to combine all the church's periodicals into one monthly publication.

1959

The new Canadian Churchman is launched under the editorship of a young priest from the diocese of Huron, Canon Gordon Baker. The January issue is printed with the publications of a half-dozen dioceses. Circulation climbs to 65,000.

1959

A new distribution concept benefiting dioceses and the national church is forged. All identifiable givers to the church receive the newspaper along with their diocesan publication. Circulation explodes to more than 200,000.

1968

Hugh McCullum, a well-respected journalist and activist, is the first editor to hire professional reporters rather than clergy to produce stories on poverty, Aboriginal land claims, pollution, abortion law reform and apartheid.

1975

In the paper's centennial year, journalist Jerry Hames, succeeds Hugh McCullum, and continues the award-winning news coverage. Hames later de-camps to New York, where he becomes editor of Episcopal Life.

1977

The newspaper's editorial policy is revised. …

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