National Association of School Psychologists Principles for Professional Ethics

School Psychology Review, June 2010 | Go to article overview

National Association of School Psychologists Principles for Professional Ethics


Principles

I. Respecting the Dignity and Rights of All Persons

School psychologists engage only in professional practices that maintain the dignity of all individuals. In their words and actions, school psychologists demonstrate respect for the autonomy of persons and their right to self-determination, respect for privacy, and a commitment to just and fair treatment of all persons.

Principle I.1 Autonomy and Self-Determination (Consent and Assent)

Principle I.2. Privacy and Confidentiality

Principle I.3. Fairness and Justice

II. Professional Competence and Responsibility

Beneficence, or responsible caring, means that the school psychologist acts to benefit others. To do this, school psychologists must practice within the boundaries of their competence, use scientific knowledge from psychology and education to help clients and others make informed choices, and accept responsibility for their work.

Principle II.1. Competence

Principle II.2. Accepting Responsibility for Actions

Principle II.3. Responsible Assessment and Intervention Practices

Principle II.4. Responsible School-Based Record Keeping

Principle II.5. Responsible Use of Materials

III. Honesty and Integrity in Professional Relationships

To foster and maintain trust, school psychologists must be faithful to the truth and adhere to their professional promises. They are forthright about their qualifications, competencies, and roles; work in full cooperation with other professional disciplines to meet the needs of students and families; and avoid multiple relationships that diminish their professional effectiveness.

Principle III.1. Accurate Presentation of Professional Qualifications

Principle III.2. Forthright Explanation of Professional Services, Roles, and Priorities

Principle III.3. Respecting Other Professionals

Principle III.4. Multiple Relationships and Conflicts of Interest

IV. Responsibility to Schools, Families, Communities, the Profession, and Society

School psychologists promote healthy school, family, and community environments. They maintain the public trust in school psychologists by respecting law and encouraging ethical conduct. School psychologists advance professional excellence by mentoring less experienced practitioners and contributing to the school psychology knowledge base.

Principle IV.1. Promoting Healthy School, Family, and Community Environments

Principle IV.2. Respect for Law and the Relationship of Law and Ethics

Principle IV.3. Maintaining Public Trust by Self-Monitoring and Peer Monitoring

Principle IV.4. Contributing to the Profession by Mentoring, Teaching, and Supervision

Principle IV.5. Contributing to the School Psychology Knowledge Base

Introduction

The mission of the National Association of School Psychologists (NASP) is to represent school psychology and support school psychologists to enhance the learning and mental health of all children and youth. NASP's mission is accomplished through identification of appropriate evidence-based education and mental health services for all children; implementation of professional practices that are empirically supported, data driven, and culturally competent; promotion of professional competence of school psychologists; recognition of the essential components of high-quality graduate education and professional development in school psychology; preparation of school psychologists to deliver a continuum of services for children, youth, families, and schools; and advocacy for the value of school psychological services, among other important initiatives.

School psychologists provide effective services to help children and youth succeed academically, socially, behaviorally, and emotionally. School psychologists provide direct educational and mental health services for children and youth, as well as work with parents, educators, and other professionals to create supportive learning and social environments for all children. …

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