Naperville's Stewards of the Past Heritage Hall of Honor Inducts Five New Members

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), July 30, 2010 | Go to article overview

Naperville's Stewards of the Past Heritage Hall of Honor Inducts Five New Members


Byline: Susan Dibble sdibble@dailyherald.com

By Susan Dibble

sdibble@dailyherald.com

The late developer and philanthropist Jim Moser did a lot to make Naperville the city it is.

Not one to turn down a request for help, the former owner of Moser Lumber and CEO of the development company Moser Enterprises contributed to many community projects over the years.

Some involvements may have been a matter of good business and politics, but other projects truly excited him.

The construction of the Pre-Emption House Visitor Center at Naper Settlement was one of them, said his son, Mitch Moser.

"He absolutely loved it. He loved the whole concept of the Pre-Emption House," Moser said. "When the idea of it came to life, he was giddy."

After years of planning, the Pre-Emption House Visitor Center opened in 1998, the year Jim Moser lost his battle with cancer.

Moser will be one of five inductees to the Naperville Heritage Society's Heritage Hall of Honor at 2 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 1, at Naper Settlement, 523 S. Webster St., Naperville. The yearly recognition honors people and organizations that have made significant contributions to preserving the history of Naperville.

Jim Moser

Jim Moser was a lifelong resident of Naperville, who returned to the community after serving in the Army to work in the family-owned Moser Lumber. He became the owner and CEO of the company in 1969, the same year the Naperville Heritage Society was founded.

Moser supported the effort to preserve Naperville's past. He and his brother, Harold, donated materials for the bandstand at the 19th century outdoor museum village.

Then when plans for re-creating the Pre-Emption House were discussed in the 1980s, Moser donated time, materials and finances to make that happen as well.

The storied history of the Pre-Emption House appealed to his father, Mitch Moser said. The original Pre-Emption House was Naperville's first hotel and tavern and the only one west of Chicago when it was built in 1834.

History was made there. Local lore had it that Abraham Lincoln once gave a speech from the Pre-Emption House roof. The building served at various times as a courthouse, sample room for local breweries and marketplace for horse trading.

Jim Moser had heard the stories about the Pre-Emption House's past from his own father, Mitch Moser said.

"It was a famous place," Mitch said. "He (Jim Moser) thought it was a tremendous addition to the downtown area."

Moser made many other contributions to Naperville that are better known than his support for the Pre-Emption House. He established Moser Enterprises Inc., a land development company, in 1986 and built many of the city's subdivisions. A plaque given when he was named the recipient of Naperville's first Outstanding Citizen Award in 1996 said that he was known by many as "The Man who built Naperville."

A founding father of the Naperville Riverwalk, Moser served as the first chairman of the Riverwalk Commission. He helped establish Safety Town and bring the DuPage Children's Museum to Naperville.

Moser wasn't one to toot his own horn, though. His daughter, Kate Ontko, said she wasn't living in Naperville at the time the planning for the Pre-Emption House was going on and her father never said much about it to her. But that was typical of him, she said.

"We found so much about the good deeds

he did later," she said.

Robert Furhoff

Robert Furhoff was just starting his Chicago business, Robert A. Furhoff, Restoration of Interiors, in 1977 when he learned about the Naperville Heritage Society's work in creating Naper Settlement. He wrote the organization a letter asking if the heritage society could use his expertise in researching the interior of the Paw Paw Post Office, which had just been moved to the site.

That was the beginning of a fruitful business association that lasted more than three decades. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Naperville's Stewards of the Past Heritage Hall of Honor Inducts Five New Members
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.