Chelsea's Wedding Is about Chelsea

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), August 2, 2010 | Go to article overview

Chelsea's Wedding Is about Chelsea


No, I wasn't invited. I shouldn't be. I'm a friend of her parents. They aren't getting married. She is. The rule that invited guests should have a personal relationship with the bride or the groom is only the latest example of how good the Clintons (and the Mezvinskys) have been at the most important job in the world: being parents.

I have, sadly, been to plenty of weddings where the only way I knew the bride was by the dress. I have always felt silly in such situations (unless I knew the groom). What was I doing there? Whose party was it?

I don't care how much the cake cost. I don't care how much any of it cost or who paid or why. I don't care who made the list. This is not a political event. It's not a State Dinner or anything close to that. It's the wedding of two pretty terrific young people. That's enough.

Anyone who has raised a child knows that there are no guarantees. You can try your best, but there's no instruction manual, and there are no sure things.

Still, there are things that make it more difficult -- for parents and children. Fame and too much money are among them. TMM, we call it out here. When you see kids who have no values, who don't understand what matters and what doesn't, who are spoiled and silly, the first thing you think is TMM. Or too much fame.

The Clintons didn't have so much money when Chelsea was growing up, but fame and fancy friends certainly made up for it. There was no place they couldn't go, nothing they couldn't do or have. They made their share of mistakes.

But Chelsea wasn't one of them.

From the first time I hung out with Bill Clinton, back when he was just the governor of a small state -- not nothing, certainly, but also not what he became -- his face changed when he talked about his daughter. …

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