Making Better Employees

Manila Bulletin, August 4, 2010 | Go to article overview

Making Better Employees


Having worked for the last 33 years in different companies and various industries, I have gained some insight into what makes better employees. Since I started very young, I am not close to retirement age yet and I still enjoy making better employees, after all better employees are so much more pleasant to be with.

Turning your employees into excellent employees should be the goal of each company and the executives that run it. Excellent employees are people on a mission to do well for the company they work in, they have the drive and dedication to do a good job, on a timely basis. These people are self-starters, work autonomously, diligent and look after the interest of the company.

Now that we know we want excellent employees, the big question is how do we make them? Ideally, you should start with people who are predisposed to being good employees to begin with. These are the ones that have the capability, proper attitude, good education, decent family background and balanced temperament. However, in the real world, you probably won't have much of a choice since the employees are already there or your company is not exactly a magnet for outstanding talent.

There are several things good managers can do to make better employees. First is that the manager himself must be capable and set a good example. It is next to impossible for employees to do well when their supervisor is someone that they do not respect and cannot seek guidance from. A manager is expected to coach employees on how to do their jobs well and to teach the inexperienced worker the correct way of doing the job properly and safely.

Second is to let the employee know the importance of his job. Understanding what you are doing and seeing where you fit in the picture goes a long way in giving you a reason to do your job well. This also gives the worker the purpose of what he is doing and he will be more aware of the critical points of his job. During World War II, the industrial base of the United States was turned into one big war machine and the workers did an outstanding job. They clearly understood what they were fighting for and that the weapons they made could save the life of their father, son, brother or husband. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Making Better Employees
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.