Classical Italy Rome, Siena, Assisi, Florence; Seven Days from Only [Pounds Sterling]639pp

Daily Mail (London), August 5, 2010 | Go to article overview

Classical Italy Rome, Siena, Assisi, Florence; Seven Days from Only [Pounds Sterling]639pp


For centuries, Italy has drawn visitors in search of culture and romance. Home to an ancient civilisation, the Renaissance, the Roman Catholic Church and the Vatican, few countries can compare with Italy's contribution to European painting and sculpture. Blend this with the striking Tuscan countryside and the vitality of Rome and you have a fantastic tour destination.

DAY 1 Scheduled flight to Rome. A coach will take you to Chianciano in the heart of Tuscany and on the edge of the Chianti vineyards. Here you will stay for the next three days in your four-star hotel, the Grand Hotel Boston or Hotel Raffaello. DAY 2 Today you have a guided tour of Siena, in medieval times one of the richest cities in the world. Its main square, the Campo, is one of the finest you will find, with its cathedral, one of the world's greatest, built from black and white marbles with the most intricate of carvings imaginable, some by Michelangelo. The journey to and from Siena reveals some of the famous Tuscan countryside with its rolling hillsides studded by tall cypress trees, shading isolated farmhouses and surrounded by vineyards.

DAY 3 Today you visit Florence, pearl of the Renaissance - a superb and beautiful city. Your guided tour includes the cathedral; the Pitti Palace; the Baptistry; Ponte Vecchio - the bridge over the river Arno lined with tasteful jewellery shops - plus much more. During the afternoon, you have a timed visit to the Uffizi Gallery - one of the finest art collections in the world, housing works by Botticelli, Titian, Raphael and Caravaggio. DAY 4 Today you drive to Assisi. This delightful medieval town, full of winding streets with lovely views over the striking Umbrian countryside, is famous for a single event - the birth of Francis, the most revered saint in Italy and one of the most remarkable men in religious history. …

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Classical Italy Rome, Siena, Assisi, Florence; Seven Days from Only [Pounds Sterling]639pp
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