Christianity Sucks? Vampire Novelist Drains Faith with Fairytale

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), August 5, 2010 | Go to article overview

Christianity Sucks? Vampire Novelist Drains Faith with Fairytale


Byline: David Brog, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

While Christians may still be in plentiful supply across America's heartland, they are fast becoming an endangered species in the rarified habitat of our coastal cities and cultural heights. The purveyors of our pop culture propound anti-Christian stereotypes with increasing frequency and intensity. So much so that even those few, brave elites who have personally embraced the faith often feel compelled to publicly condemn it.

The latest cultural darling to denounce Christianity and all of its works is Ann Rice. This famous vampire novelist and pop theologian announced last week that she was rejecting Christianity as an organized religion. She is still a Christian, mind you. Simply a better one than those millions who actually go to church.

In particular, Ms. Rice informed us that, regarding Christianity, It's simply impossible for me to 'belong' to this quarrelsome, hostile, disputatious, and deservedly infamous group. She further explained her decision by noting that she refused to be anti-gay, "anti-feminist " anti-scienc "and"anti-Democrat."

Good for Ann Rice. She should absolutely reject such hatreds and any institutions that promote them. Had she belonged to the Ku Klux Klan or the American Nazi Party, I'd absolutely applaud her apostasy. But Christianity? It seems that Ms. Rice has conjured up a Christian world every bit as dark as that inhabited by her blood-drinking protagonists. And one that is equally fictitious.

Christianity is anti-feminist? Historically speaking, Christianity has actually been an enormous boon to women. Until Christianity came along, the Greeks and Romans who dominated European culture were proud practitioners of infanticide. They commonly killed their baby girls as expendable errors in their quest for sons. The same still happens to this very day in China, India and many other countries around the world, although sex-selective abortion has replaced infanticide as the corrective of choice.

As for the present day, I'm not sure what church Ms. Rice attended. But the hundreds that I've had the privilege of visiting around the country typically help their members rise above the petty preoccupations of our culture - from alcohol and video games to pornography and vampire novels - to embrace family, service and love.

Christianity is anti-science? Please - let's not trot out that tired old charge yet again. It is far more historically accurate to claim that Christianity fostered science. By asserting that our world was designed by a creator according to a logical blueprint, Christianity helped give birth to the idea that we could benefit by studying creation and discovering these underlying patterns. The opposition of some Christians to the teaching of evolution today hardly renders the diverse body of Christendom anti science. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Christianity Sucks? Vampire Novelist Drains Faith with Fairytale
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.