The Arrogance of Judicial Power; Homosexuals Hijack Political Process for Their Own Ends

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), August 6, 2010 | Go to article overview

The Arrogance of Judicial Power; Homosexuals Hijack Political Process for Their Own Ends


Byline: THE WASHINGTON TIMES

A homosexual judge branded 7,001,084 California voters as hateful people on Wednesday. In so doing, Vaughn R. Walker, a man never elected to his lifetime position, decided he would reshape the state to better suit his personal lifestyle preference. In striking down Proposition 8's simple statement that, Only marriage between a man and a woman is valid or recognized in California, Judge Vaughn undermined not just the political process, but society itself.

At the heart of the matter is the belief of the chief judge of the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California that there is no problem with Heather having two mommies. Those who do have a problem with such arrangements, in his words, can only be motivated by irrational fear and animus. By discarding the possibility that centuries of tradition might have a rational basis, Judge Vaughn declared Proposition 8 cannot be allowed to interfere with homosexuals' fundamental right to marry under the Due Process Clause.

The claim is that no government interest could be found in preferring the union of traditional couples to that of homosexual couples. The evidence did not show any historical purpose for excluding same-sex couples from marriage, as states have never required spouses to have an ability or willingness to procreate in order to marry, Mr. Vaughn asserted. Rather, the exclusion exists as an artifact of a time when the genders were seen as having distinct roles in society and in marriage. …

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