How Long Will This Take?

By Kelley, Raina | Newsweek, August 16, 2010 | Go to article overview

How Long Will This Take?


Kelley, Raina, Newsweek


Byline: Number 17, NYC and Raina Kelley

When a federal judge on Aug. 4 struck down California's ban on same-sex marriage, it was a victory for gay rights. But the issue is likely to end up before the U.S. Supreme Court, where its fate is uncertain. History shows the battle for equality can be long. But as Martin Luther King Jr. wrote in "Letter From a Birmingham Jail," Ajustice too long delayed is justice denied.A

EQUAL RIGHTS FOR AFRICAN-AMERICANS

1619

First enslaved Africans arrive at Jamestown.

1783

Mass. bans slavery.

1852

Uncle Tom's Cabin galvanizes the anti-slavery movement.

1863

Emancipation Proclamation ends slavery in the South.

1865

The 13th Amendment abolishes slavery.

1868

The 14th Amendment grants citizenship to blacks.

1870

The 15th Amendment gives black men the right to vote.

1948

President Truman ends military segregation.

1954

Supreme Court declares school segregation unconstitutional.

1955

Rosa Parks's refusal to give up her seat leads to the Montgomery bus boycott.

1963

Martin Luther King Jr. delivers his AI Have a DreamA speech.

1964

Civil Rights Act ends

Jim Crow.

1965

President Johnson signs the Voting Rights Act. 1967

Supreme Court makes interracial marriage legal.

2008

Barack Obama is elected president.

EQUAL RIGHTS FOR WOMEN

1826

Public high schools for girls open in New York and Boston.

1848The first Women's Rights Convention is held in Seneca Falls, N.Y.

1850Ore. allows married women to own land in their own names.

1920The 19th Amendment gives women the vote.

1963Equal Pay Act prohibits wage discrimination based on gender. …

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