Bringing Local History to Life; Ever Wondered What It Would Be like Living in South Wales in the Past? Local Author Sue Barrow Tells Kirstie McCrum about Taking a Step Back in Time to Find out about Life through the Centuries with Her Two New Children's Books

South Wales Echo (Cardiff, Wales), August 11, 2010 | Go to article overview

Bringing Local History to Life; Ever Wondered What It Would Be like Living in South Wales in the Past? Local Author Sue Barrow Tells Kirstie McCrum about Taking a Step Back in Time to Find out about Life through the Centuries with Her Two New Children's Books


Byline: Kirstie McCrum

HOW much do you know about the history of South Wales, the angry iron workers who marched through Merthyr in protest over their working conditions or the Protestant martyrs who were burnt at the stake in Cardiff? Two new books written for primary school children should ensure the next generation grow up knowing all about the big events which have shaped our local communities thanks to local author Sue Barrow.

The mother of five has produced two books in the Hometown History series, one on Cardiff and one on the Valleys.

The books are published by Hometown World, part of a series for children aged four to 14, which gets local authors to write about their own area with their own expertise as well as sound historical research.

Having previously written a novel for teenagers, Keeping Secrets, set in Pontypridd, 57-year-old Sue admits to being something of a flag flyer for the area.

She left Cardiff briefly in the 1970s to do a history degree in London before returning to her roots, and explains that it's her love of Welsh history which made the project such a joy to be a part of.

"Welsh history was a compulsory part of the syllabus when I was at school if you chose to do history for O-levels. I always loved history and liked reading historic novels.

"The Welsh history on the curriculum is still great these days. Children are taught the importance of knowing where they've come from and the contribution that Wales has made to the history of the UK," she says.

Putting together a fully illustrated history of the area was no struggle for Sue, who lives in Rhiwbina, Cardiff, where she was born and brought up.

As a child, she attended Rhiwbina Primary School and Whitchurch Grammar, now Whitchurch High School.

"Cardiff is such a fascinating city and the castle is there in the centre. The book goes right back to Roman times and right up to the present with all the work that was done in the Victorian era as well, so it's a great city to write about," she says.

Outside the capital, history is very rich in the Valleys too, as Sue explained.

"The Valleys has a lot of famous and very valuable history because it's what really shapes the Valleys today.

"If you think about the industrial past, the iron, steel and coal, it's now completely gone, but you can't drive through the Valleys without seeing reminders.

"It shapes the people; they're still living in Valleys as very tight communities," she explains.

Sue's knowledge of the Welsh Val-* One of the illustrations from Sue Barrow's book Hometown History, Welsh Valleys leys is first-hand as well, and she has a real fondness for the area.

"When my husband and I got married our first house was in Pontypridd.

"I loved Ponty so much; it's a place that's really full of character and that's why I based my first novel Keeping Secrets there.

"I liked the idea of somewhere which had real identity and it is the gateway to the Valleys."

The Hometown History books are easy to read, with colourful illustrations and photographs and real documentation from the past.

A fan of writing since childhood, Sue had thought about writing some historical fiction but it wasn't until the Hometown World project popped up that she got her dream - to write about the past in the place she loves.

She has combined the job with a part-time human resources role with the NHS.

"When one of my youngest daughters, who is 20 now, was in her last year of junior school, I went with her class on a school trip around Cardiff.

"We spent all of our time looking up because a lot of the buildings have dates on them. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Bringing Local History to Life; Ever Wondered What It Would Be like Living in South Wales in the Past? Local Author Sue Barrow Tells Kirstie McCrum about Taking a Step Back in Time to Find out about Life through the Centuries with Her Two New Children's Books
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.