Art Deco Name Still in Style; under the Hammer

Liverpool Echo (Liverpool, England), August 14, 2010 | Go to article overview

Art Deco Name Still in Style; under the Hammer


Byline: Mike Litherland

OUR fine art sale at the end of July with our partners Thomson Roddick, Medcalfe, Carlise produced some amazing prices, with lots coming in from Merseyside, Cheshire, Lancashire and NorthWales.

Lot 400 was a Rathbone Della Robbia circular pottery charger by the graffito decorator Cassandia Ann Walker. The central panel had a stylised flowerhead roundel on radiating acanthus leaves surrounded by a border of stylised peonies and leaves, decorated in green, yellow, red and brown on a mottled thinly glazed green ground, incised monogram and galleon mark, dated 1905. It sold for pounds 1,825.

This Art Deco figure group of three little girls under an umbrella (pictured) in bronze with ivory faces, on a green shaped onyx base, by Chiparus signed No 6361, with impressed marks on base, Fabrication Francaise, Paris, G.M sold for a staggering pounds 6,200.

Demetre Haralamb Chiparus was born in Romania. In 1909, he went to Italy where he attended the classes of Italian sculptor Raffaello Romanelli. In 1912, he travelled to Paris to pursue his art.

His first sculptures were of children, created from bronze and ivory. As time went on they were in the Art Deco style. He was influenced by the Russian Ballet, Ancient Egyptian art, French theatre, and early motion pictures; typified by figures with a long, slender stylised appearance. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Art Deco Name Still in Style; under the Hammer
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.