Uncovering Mysteries along the Silk Road

USA TODAY, August 2010 | Go to article overview

Uncovering Mysteries along the Silk Road


One of the most important archaeological finds ever unearthed are the hundreds of well-preserved mummies that were found buried in the parched sands of the Tarim Basin in the Far Western Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region of China. A revealing exhibition, "Secrets of the Silk Road: Mystery Mummies from China," showcases 150 ancient objects discovered along the famous Silk Road, including three mummies who underscore the "secret" of the exhibit.

"These three mummies are ... among the most important human remains and archaeological finds because of their high degree of preservation, which has allowed scientists to see far more detail than would normally be expected in a burial site," asserts Victor Mair, professor of Chinese Language and Literature at the University of Pennsylvania, consulting scholar at the Penn Museum, and author of The Tarim Mummies.

"Secrets of the Silk Road" includes the much-celebrated Yingpan Man, with his gold-foil and white mask and beautiful robes; an infant wrapped in a woolen blanket, wearing a bonnet of lightly felted wool; and the spectacular woman known as the "Beauty of Xiaohe," who is considered to be one of the most well-preserved, exquisite mummies ever discovered. With her graceful eyelashes, flaxen hair, and serene expression, this lovely lady simply appears to have fallen asleep, yet she last dosed her eyes some 3,800 years ago. Her loved ones dressed her in fur-lined boots and placed a felted wool hat with plumes of feathers upon her head. At her shoulder was a basket of grain for her journey to the afterlife. Wrapped in a finely crafted burial shroud and placed in a boat-shaped coffin, she was left for eternal sleep.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

These mummies are not Asian-looking, but rather light-skinned, round-eyed, long-nosed, red- and blond-haired men, women, and children. The material buried with them, including their perfectly preserved clothing, bears a striking resemblance to mummies found in Siberia to the North, Persia to the West, and Europe. Even more surprising is that these mummies span a period of more than 3,000 years, providing a glimpse into the ancient Silk Road traders, an intriguing mix of people--based on DNA research--from all over Eurasia.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

In addition to the mummies, the exhibit features a vast array of well-preserved clothing, textiles, wood and bone implements, coins, documents, and jewel-encrusted gold objects, including vessels, masks, and jewelry. This impressive collection reflects the full extent of the Silk Road trade with strong Mediterranean influences, as well as goods from ancient China. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Uncovering Mysteries along the Silk Road
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.