Muriel Moyle, Nee Crousaz: 6 January 1909 to 25-Apr-10

By Moyle, Wendy; Grant, Chris E. et al. | British Journal of Occupational Therapy, August 2010 | Go to article overview

Muriel Moyle, Nee Crousaz: 6 January 1909 to 25-Apr-10


Moyle, Wendy, Grant, Chris E., Steedon, Beryl, British Journal of Occupational Therapy


Muriel Violet Elsie Crousaz was born in Guernsey, in the Channel Islands. She was educated there at the Ladies College, where she excelled at most subjects, but particularly history and art. On leaving school she went to a London art school, where she trained as a fashion artist and gained employment in this field for a couple of years. Becoming bored with this, she went on to train as an occupational therapist at the Dorset House School in Bristol, opened by Dr Elizabeth Casson in 1930. She would have been one of its earliest students.

The Association of Occupational Therapists was founded in 1936 and Miss Crousaz appears regularly in its first journals, from 1938 to 1942, as a council member, a member of the examining board, a member of the sub-committee to investigate salaries, hours and conditions of work and a member of the war executive. From November 1937 to May 1938 she fulfilled an ambition to visit the United States, which she 'had always considered to be the home of occupational therapy'. She published a fascinating account of her experiences, which included meeting Miss Willard and Miss Spackman in Philadelphia and Mrs Slagle in New York. There were visits to occupational therapy services in Toronto, Detroit, Michigan and Baltimore. In 1938, she was listed as working at the Rheumatism Clinic, Hospital of St John and St Elizabeth, London.

Following the outbreak of World War II, she worked with brain-damaged and ex-forces personnel, and by 1942 was working at Dorset House School of Occupational Therapy in its wartime home at Barnsley Hall EMS Hospital, Bromsgrove, Worcestershire. …

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