Africans and Slavery: Let's Be Grown Up Enough to Begin to Discuss Slavery - to Look at Which African States Benefitted, and Why Certain African Elites Eagerly Chose This Method to Drive Their Economies - Rather Than Try to Close Down This Discussion as Many People Are Trying to Do

By Wambu, Onyekachi | New African, August-September 2010 | Go to article overview

Africans and Slavery: Let's Be Grown Up Enough to Begin to Discuss Slavery - to Look at Which African States Benefitted, and Why Certain African Elites Eagerly Chose This Method to Drive Their Economies - Rather Than Try to Close Down This Discussion as Many People Are Trying to Do


Wambu, Onyekachi, New African


The criticisms of Henry Louis Gates' recent comments on slavery reparations partly miss the point. Critics are right to dismiss Gates' suggestions regarding his ancestors of a moral equivalence between the Europeans and Africans. The Europeans organised the system, the brutality and horrors they visited on the victims of slavery. We should continue to press for reparations for the descendants of those enslaved victims who suffered and died on the plantations, whose labour was provided free for hundreds of years, and who were denied basic rights.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

But we should think about African enslavement not as a one-system crime, but a three-system crime, each of those demanding different remedies and reparations. When in 1995 some of us began an African Remembrance Day on 1 August to mourn the victims of enslavement, we deliberately held a three-minute silence at 3 pm. One minute was for Western victims, one minute was for the victims on the African continent itself, and another minute was for the Muslim and Fast East victims.

As Africans, we have barely begun to scratch the surface of the crimes committed on our continent, and to name the guilty. Despite the fact that there was active African resistance at all times, Gates was nevertheless right to name some of the African states and empires that fed the diabolical trade, especially if this naming actually allows us to better understand tensions that currently exist in so many African countries between people who have been conquered and enslaved by others, and their conquerors who continue to look down on them.

In 2003, I spoke to a South Sudanese intellectual about why they were not vocally supportive of the people of Darfur during the ethnic cleansing crisis. His response was interesting: "Why should we help them", he said, "since the 16th century they joined their 'Arab' Muslim brothers to raid for slaves amongst us, the so-called 'Kaffirs'. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Africans and Slavery: Let's Be Grown Up Enough to Begin to Discuss Slavery - to Look at Which African States Benefitted, and Why Certain African Elites Eagerly Chose This Method to Drive Their Economies - Rather Than Try to Close Down This Discussion as Many People Are Trying to Do
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.