Playing with Fire; Koran-Burning Is Inflaming Muslims Worldwide

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), September 9, 2010 | Go to article overview

Playing with Fire; Koran-Burning Is Inflaming Muslims Worldwide


Byline: Arnaud de Borchgrave, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

A Southern Baptist preacher with a flock of 50 in Gaines- ville, Fla., decided to mark the ninth anniversary of Sept. 11, 2001, by lighting a fire that quickly circled the globe - with a public burning of the Koran, much the way Hitler ordered public bonfires with books written by Jews.

The Rev. Terry Jones dubbed it International Burn a Koran Day. The sign outside his Dove World Outreach Center Church reads, Islam Is of the Devil, next to which this instant celebrity posed for national and international media.

For Muslims, the Koran is the word of God, as dictated to the Prophet Muhammad. Within hours, angry crowds had gathered in Kabul, Afghanistan, and Jakarta, Indonesia, and other Muslim capitals, threatening retaliation if Mr. Jones goes through with his plan on Sept. 11. Christians in Muslim countries suddenly felt threatened, and Afghan army recruits demanded explanations of their American advisers.

Unless Mr. Jones canceled his Koran book-burning, Christians throughout the world's 1.2-billion-strong Muslim nations and Muslim communities suddenly would feel threatened. Those who converted from Islam to Christianity would be prime targets.

For many Muslims, Sept. 11 was a pretext former President George W. Bush used to launch a crusade against Islam. This, in turn, persuaded countless Pakistanis, even Western-educated ones, to swallow the canard that the FBI and Mossad had plotted Sept. 11. The objective was a pretext to attack Afghanistan as a backdoor into Pakistan - and its nuclear arsenal.

For Muslims everywhere, the burning of the Koran could only mean that Christians hate Muslims. In 2005, a Danish cartoon satirizing the Prophet triggered bloody riots from Indonesia to Afghanistan to Pakistan to Libya to Nigeria; in all, scores were killed. One Nigerian group threw a tire around one man, poured gasoline on him and set him ablaze. Ambassadors were recalled and embassies attacked. The Danish cartoonist pressed his attack by telling interviewers his drawings were inspired by terrorism - which gets its spiritual ammunition from Islam.

Even if a superannuated preacher canceled the public burning of the Koran, the damage already had been done. Other men of the cloth in the South have leveled similar accusations against Islam.

The Rev. James Collins has been described by his friends as one of the most respected Christian ministers in the South. Muslims, this verbal bomb-thrower says, continue the agenda of world conquest with lies, deception, terrorism, poverty, child molestation, enslavement of women, honor killings and ultimate death to all infidels who do not submit to Islam and the nonexistent moon god they call Allah. His perorations are downhill from there.

These are the counterparts of what is taught in Koranic madrassas in Pakistan, where young boys are brainwashed with horror stories about Christian and Jewish infidels out to destroy Islam. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Playing with Fire; Koran-Burning Is Inflaming Muslims Worldwide
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.