LISA'S IDEAL HOLMES SHOW; STUNNING ACTRESS TURNS: SCREAM QUEEN AFTER BIG BREAK IN SHERLOCK: Baker Street Star Reveals Horror Roles

Sunday Mail (Glasgow, Scotland), September 12, 2010 | Go to article overview

LISA'S IDEAL HOLMES SHOW; STUNNING ACTRESS TURNS: SCREAM QUEEN AFTER BIG BREAK IN SHERLOCK: Baker Street Star Reveals Horror Roles


Byline: JOHN MILLAR

SHERLOCK has been hailed as the best BBC drama series since Doctor Who was rejuvenated.

While Benedict Cumberbatch and Martin Freeman won plaudits for their turns as the Baker Street detective and his trusty sidekick Watson, critics hailed Lisa McAllister for stealing the show.

Now fresh from her role as Mycroft Holmes's assistant, the 29-year-old is set to stake her claim as Scotland's scream queen by battling vampires and zombies in a series of horror flicks.

The actress stars opposite Craig Fairbrass in the gangsters-versusvampires chiller Dead Cert. Then she and Danny Dyer are on the run from flesh-munching zombies in The Devil's Playground.

After that, Lisa is to star in a remake of 1970s cult horror The Asphyx, which is about a mad scientist trying to bottle the secret of immortality.

She said: "I love the blood and gore - it's great fun doing horror films.

"Part of the fun is being covered in fake blood for a wee while. When I did Dead Cert, I was gutted it was only for one scene that I got to wear amazing vampire fangs and cool contact lenses that were red round the outside with yellow centres."

Lisa has enjoyed being scared by movies since she was young.

She said: "If I go to the cinema to see a horror film, I get completely caught up in it and jump out of my seat when something scary happens.

"I like the Hammer movies and I grew up watching stuff like the Nightmare On Elm Street films and It, Stephen King's clown horror.

"That's still scary. It came on TV the other night when I was alone in the flat and when I heard the voice of Tim Curry as Pennywise, the clown, I jumped in fright. It brought back childhood memories of scaring yourself senseless watching creepy films."

Born in Shawlands, Glasgow, Lisa moved to Surrey when she was young. But despite all that time south of the border, she has kept her accent.

She said: "I don't think my family would forgive me if I lost my accent."

On screen, though, Lisa has usually been cast as English characters. The exception to that was when she had a part in the TV paranormal drama series Sea Of Souls.

She said: "I would love to play some more Scottish characters."

Her family is proud of her acting achievements but her grandmother Isa isn't sure about Lisa's fondness for getting her teeth into zombie and vampire romps.

Lisa said: "Gran still has a broad Glaswegian accent and she'll say, 'Not another one o' they horror films. I cannae watch them'.

"So my gran won't go to see many of my movies but she might come along for a drink at the premiere."

It will delight granny that Lisa isn't just a sucker for horror movies. The actress, who appeared in Simon Pegg's big-screen comedy How To Lose Friends And Alienate People, is game for a laugh, too. And she hopes to prove it in a romantic comedy that's being specially written for her about an angel falling head over wings for a down-toearth girl.

Lisa will also be seen in the comedy Killing Bono, about someone who missed out on the chance to have global rock stardom as a member of U2. …

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