The Man Who Lost 12 Stone with a Gastric Bypass, Then Sued the NHS Because He'd Rather Be Fat

Daily Mail (London), September 16, 2010 | Go to article overview

The Man Who Lost 12 Stone with a Gastric Bypass, Then Sued the NHS Because He'd Rather Be Fat


Byline: Andrew Levy

AT 24 stone, Tim Daily was so overweight he was battling mini-strokes, diabetes and a heart condition.

The 47-year-old's obesity problem was serious enough that he was offered a gastric bypass operation on the NHS.

But although the surgery helped him lose half his body weight over the next four months, he says the results have left him in a 'living hell'.

He experiences agonising pain whenever he swallows solid food, has been treated in hospital for malnutrition and is now fed through a tube linked directly to his stomach.

Mr Daily, a financial adviser, said: 'I would rather be 24 stone again than live like this.

'It is a living hell. I'm not the happychappy guy I used to be. I feel down all the time. I'm ill and desperate. I crave food every day.

'On a good day I can eat a biscuit washed down with plenty of morphine.

Otherwise I don't eat.

'I was always a very social person. Going out for meals was a huge part of my life. I can't even pop out for a meal - it's ruined my life.

'If I do eat a meal I'm having to down loads of morphine then my wife has to cart me off because I've passed out.

'Christmas dinner, Easter, family occasions - they are all ruined for me.

'I was promised when I had the operation I would still be able to eat afterwards.

'How would you like it if you could never eat food again?' He is suing the NHS for a six-figure sum, claiming that he was not warned about possible complications from the [pounds sterling]12,000 surgery. He says he has been left with the choice of never eating solids again or a one in four chance of death if he has experimental corrective surgery.

'I could die if I have the corrective operation. I'm only 47 and I can't put myself at risk because I have a wife, two daughters and two grandchildren,' he added.

Mr Daily, who is 5ft 11in, had the gastric bypass operation in October 2008 when his body mass index stood at nearly 47 - morbidly obese. Anything above 30 is considered obese.

The operation realigned his digestive tract and reduced the size of his stomach with staples to prevent him eating too much or too often. …

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