Works Received

China Review International, Summer 2009 | Go to article overview

Works Received


Jianhua Bai. Chinese Grammar Made Easy: A Practical and Effective Guide for Teachers. Yale University Press, 2009.

Doris T. Chang. Women's Movements in Twentieth-Century Taiwan. University of Illinois Press, 2009.

Jianguo Chen. The Aesthetics of the "Beyond": Phantasm, Nostalgia, and the Literary Practice in Contemporary China. University of Deleware Press, 2009.

Robert Finlay. The Pilgrim Art: Cultures of Porcelain in World History. University of California Press, 2010.

Jonathan Holslag. China + India: Prospects for Peace. Columbia University Press, 2010.

Ian Johnston. The Mozi: A Complete Translation. Chinese University Press, 2009.

Lynne Joiner. Honorable Survivor: Mao's China, McCarthy's America, and the Persecution of John S. Service. United States Naval Institute, 2009.

Livia Kohn. Readings in Daoist Mysticism. Three Pines Press, 2009.

Dieter Kuhn. The Age of Confucian Rule: The Song Transformation of China. Harvard University Press, 2009.

James Leibold. Reconfiguring Chinese Nationalism: How the Qing Frontier and Its Indigenes Became Chinese. Palgrave Macmillan, 2007.

Xiaoping Lin. Children of Marx and Coca-Cola: Chinese Avant-Garde Art and Independent Cinema. University of Hawai'i Press, 2010.

Xun Liu. Daoist Modern: Innovation, Lay Practice, and the Community of Inner Alchemy in Republican China. Harvard University Press, 2009.

Marc L. Moskowitz. Cries of Joy, Songs of Sorrow. University of Hawai'i Press, 2010.

Klaus Muhlhahn. Criminal Justice in China: A History. Harvard University Press, 2009.

Micah S. Muscolino. Fishing Wars and Environmental Change in Late Imperial and Modern China. Harvard University Press, 2009.

Ingrid Nielsen and Russell Smyth. Migration and Social Protection in China. …

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