Martial Law Insignificant Now - Solons

Manila Bulletin, September 20, 2010 | Go to article overview

Martial Law Insignificant Now - Solons


MANILA, Philippines - Instead of explaining the pros and cons of martial law, two senior lawmakers who played key roles during its declaration would rather leave it to history books to assess its significance to the present and future circumstance of the country's political, social, and economic condition.As far as they are concerned, Reps. Sergio Apostol (Lakas-Kampi, Leyte) and Rodolfo Biazon (LP, Muntinlupa City) there is no more need for the country to mark the 38th anniversary of the declaration of martial law today and the years to come because the nation has already shaken off the ill effects of military rule and has retained its good lessons.The two elderly solons noted that political personalities behind the declaration of martial law who were heavily criticized in the past have return to the political scene. This, they both agreed, is a clear manifestation that Filipinos have forgotten martial law and have started to consider more the contributions these politicians have given to strengthen democratic institutions in the country."People have appreciated their work that is why they are still here," Apostol said, referring to the Marcoses and the Enriles who remain among the top political leaders of the nation.For his part, Biazon noted that the Philippines is now ruled by a President whose family fought the Marcos regime and a Senate President who was the principal enforcer of military rule."Being elected was not influenced by the role they played during the martial law but rather their projected role to be played after the restoration of democracy," said Biazon, a former military general who helped oust the Marcos government.Martial Law was declared on September 21, 1972 by the then President Ferdinand E. …

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