A Tender Kiss for Douglas as He Braves Premiere

Daily Mail (London), September 22, 2010 | Go to article overview

A Tender Kiss for Douglas as He Braves Premiere


Byline: Simon Cable

IN the middle of a gruelling fight against throat cancer, Michael Douglas understandably did not feel up to talking to the gathered crowd at the premiere of his latest film.

But the supportive kiss on the lips he received from his wife as he walked down the red carpet, pictured below, spoke volumes.

The strain of the past few weeks of punishing chemotherapy and radiotherapy sessions clearly showed as Douglas and Catherine Zeta-Jones attended the New York opening of the sequel to Wall Street, one of his biggest films.

The Oscar-winning actor and producer, who will turn 66 this week on the same day his wife turns 41, recently revealed how the treatment has left him with sores in his mouth which make it extremely difficult to eat and swallow.

Although Douglas braved Monday night's premiere of Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps, in which he reprises his role of hard-nosed financial trader Gordon Gekko after 23 years, he has had to axe plans to travel for the film's British premiere next week.

Earlier this month, Douglas appeared on David Letterman's U.S. chat show, where he revealed that the cancer had spread beyond its original tumour and was now worse than first feared.

He admitted that his illness was now stage four - which can often prove fatal - claiming that a lifetime of drinking and smoking had been the most likely cause. …

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A Tender Kiss for Douglas as He Braves Premiere
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