Schools Parable: 'Floating Babies'

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), September 29, 2010 | Go to article overview

Schools Parable: 'Floating Babies'


Byline: Marybeth Hicks, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Social scientists use the parable of the floating babies to remind us that we can't solve a problem until we know its source.

You know this story: The townspeople meet at the riverbank for a celebration when suddenly they notice a baby struggling to stay afloat in the river's rushing waters. Someone runs to save the baby; then he notices another one coming from upstream. More and more babies come rushing down the river as the people of the town quickly make a human chain to try to save the infants.

When a few townsfolk run upstream along the riverbank, someone yells, Where are you going?

We're going to find out who is throwing these babies into the river and stop them!

A new documentary, Waiting for Superman, is posing the question: Just who is throwing an entire generation of American children into the rough and dangerous waters of public education, only to drown in a torrent of mediocrity?

The film is being criticized for pointing out that America's teachers unions too often protect incompetent educators and perpetuate a system that rewards longevity over talent. Being unions, they place the economic goals of their members over the educational needs of the children they supposedly serve. (Why does this surprise some people?)

Still, it's simplistic - and believe it or not, convenient - to point fingers only at the National Education Association and the American Federation of Teachers. We have to look farther up the river.

The problem is poorly prepared and uneducated teachers, and for that, we can thank the recently retired Bill Ayers, the former distinguished professor of education at the University of Illinois at Chicago and late of the Weather Underground.

Most folks don't realize that in the decades between Mr. Ayers' infamous taunt, Guilty as hell, free as a bird, and then-candidate Barack Obama's disingenuous explanation, He's just a guy from my neighborhood, Mr. …

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