Libraries in Sync with iPod Users

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), October 1, 2010 | Go to article overview

Libraries in Sync with iPod Users


Byline: JEANNIE NUSS Associated Press

GRANDVIEW HEIGHTS, Ohio -- Libraries are tweeting, texting and launching smart-phone apps as they try to keep up with the biblio-techs -- a computer-savvy class of people who consider card catalogs as vintage as typewriters. And they seem to be pulling it off.

Since libraries started rebranding themselves for the iPod generation, thousands of music geeks have downloaded free songs from library websites. And with many more bookworms waiting months to check out wireless reading devices, libraries are shrugging off the notion that the Internet shelved them.

"People tend to have this antiquated version of libraries, like there's not much more inside than books and microfiche," says Hiller Goodspeed, a 22-year-old graphic designer in Orlando, Fla., who uses the Orange County Library System's iPhone app to discover foreign films.

The latest national data from the Institute of Museum and Library Services show that library visits and circulation climbed nearly 20 percent from 1999 to 2008.

Since then, experts say, technology has continued to drive in-person visits and circulation.

"It also brings people back to the library that might have left thinking that the library wasn't relevant for them," says Chris Tonjes, the information technology director at the public library in Washington, D.C.

Public library systems have provided free Internet access and lent movies and music for years. They have a good track record of syncing up with past technological advances, from vinyl to VHS.

"They've always had competition," says Roger Levien, a strategy consultant in Stamford, Conn., who also serves as an American Library Association fellow. "Bookstores have existed in the past. I'm sure they will find ways to adapt."

Now, the digital sphere is expanding: 82 percent of the nation's more than 16,000 public libraries have Wi-Fi -- up from 37 percent four years ago, according to the American Library Association.

Since the recession hit, more people are turning to libraries to surf the Web.

A growing number of libraries are launching mobile websites and smart-phone applications, says Jason Griffey, author of "Mobile Technology and Libraries. …

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