Media Management : The Web Is Not All; Are Newspapers Being Swept into Oblivion by the Internet? Ian Grant Explains Why the Rumour of Their Imminent Death Has Been Greatly Exaggerated

New Zealand Management, July 2009 | Go to article overview

Media Management : The Web Is Not All; Are Newspapers Being Swept into Oblivion by the Internet? Ian Grant Explains Why the Rumour of Their Imminent Death Has Been Greatly Exaggerated


Byline: Ian Grant

Conventional wisdom is that newspapers are doomed a[euro]" going the way of the dinosaurs in a brave, new electronic world. This belief is firmly fixed a[euro]" as so many things are a[euro]" on the American experience where newspapers, including illustrious and time-honoured titles, are crashing like pins in a bowling alley.

But, as is also often the case, the American experience is of limited relevance elsewhere. Reasons why the daily press is in deep trouble in the United States include: ownership by debt-ridden conglomerates in largely self-inflicted financial straits; owners with little newspaper history much more interested in bottom-line than in quality journalism; regional and local TV stations that a[euro]delivera[euro] cost-effective audiences to advertisers; competing morning and evening dailies in markets where there is no longer room for both; poor management that has panicked over the internet while producing stodgy newspapers and slashing newsroom staff a[euro]" their lifeblood.

Take a global perspective, and the newspaper business is not on its deathbed. The World Association of Newspapers reported in late May a 1.3 percent increase in newspaper circulation world-wide in 2008. While most of that growth was in countries like India, digital delivery was also increasing total readership in the developed world. The reality is that newspapers are going to have an increasingly symbiotic relationship with the internet.

How to compete or cooperate with website babble and blogger bedlam are continuing issues a[euro]" but ita[euro]s a matter of adaptation rather than surrender. It was, after all, not so long ago that television was going to bury newspapers. The Americans seem to have had no online strategy: they put everything on their websites, the public said a[euro]thank youa[euro] and stopped buying newspapers. There is now an argument raging about whether online content should be paid for or free a[euro]" long after that particular horse is happily grazing several paddocks away.

More relevant says Tim Pankhurst, former Dominion Post editor and newly appointed head of the Newspaper Publishersa[euro] Association, is how to manage the mix of newsprint and online content.

a[euro]Because radio and a number of internet websites will be doing it, it makes sense to get a[euro]breaking newsa[euro] up on your site as quickly as possible,a[euro] says Pankhurst. a[euro]But it makes even more sense to hold onto exclusive stories no-one else has a[euro]" investigative pieces or even local court and council reports a[euro]" for the next print edition.a[euro]

How well are New Zealand newspapers surviving? Evening newspapers have largely gone and today, there are five main centre and 17 provincial dailies in a country with a population half the size of the Chicago metropolitan area, which has two dailies, both recently filing for bankruptcy. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Media Management : The Web Is Not All; Are Newspapers Being Swept into Oblivion by the Internet? Ian Grant Explains Why the Rumour of Their Imminent Death Has Been Greatly Exaggerated
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.