A Fine Romance

By Alston, Joshua | Newsweek, October 18, 2010 | Go to article overview

A Fine Romance


Alston, Joshua, Newsweek


Byline: Joshua Alston

To Monica and David, no aspect of the American Dream is off limits.

Who among us can resist a tale of all-consuming true love? Within everyone there is a true romantic, a cellular understanding of how intoxicating, maddening, and life-affirming love can be. The courtship of Monica and David is that kind of love story. He met her in class and was instantly smitten. She rejected him at first because she had a boyfriend, but he persisted. Now they're married, and completely stuck on each other. He calls her his Winnie the Pooh, and he's her Prince Charming. The rub, because all love stories come with one, is that both Monica and David have Down syndrome. Marriages between people with Down syndrome were unheard of in the mid-'80s, when the life expectancy for those with the disorder was 25. That age has risen to 60, and with it, the desire of those with Down syndrome for companionship.

The wedding and the happily-ever-after are chronicled in Monica & David, the Tribeca Film Festival-winning documentary that airs Oct. 14 on HBO. It's a refreshing and rare story for television. A just-released study revealed the dearth of characters with disabilities on television. The only recent examples of characters with Down syndrome include Glee's Becky Jackson, one of the school's mean-girl cheerleaders, and a controversy-courting depiction of a rude and demanding love interest for Chris on Family Guy. In that sense, Monica & David is a triumph--and not just for them.

Monica and David's parents provide the story's conflict with the inner turmoil they experience as they begin to cede control to the children they've spent years caring for. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

A Fine Romance
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.