Cut off NPR; Public Radio Fires Distinguished Journalist for Recognizing Muslim Threat

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), October 21, 2010 | Go to article overview

Cut off NPR; Public Radio Fires Distinguished Journalist for Recognizing Muslim Threat


Byline: THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Respected National Public Radio analyst Juan Williams lost his job this week for offending liberal orthodoxy. On the bright side, no one can ever again defend NPR as being fair and balanced. This experiment in taxpayer-supported broadcasting must be put out to pasture.

I'm not a bigot. You know the kind of books I've written about the civil rights movement in this country, Mr. Williams told Bill O'Reilly on Monday. But when I get on a plane, I got to tell you, if I see people who are in Muslim garb and I think, you know, they are identifying themselves first and foremost as Muslims, I get worried. I get nervous. On Wednesday, NPR terminated its contract with Mr. Williams, saying his remarks were inconsistent with our editorial standards and practices, and undermined his credibility as a news analyst with NPR.

A post on the NPR website said Mr. O'Reilly has been looking for support for his own remarks on a recent episode of ABC's 'The View' in which he directly blamed Muslims for the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks. News flash to NPR: Muslims are to blame for the Sept. 11 attacks. The terrorists who killed 3,000 people were Islamic extremists, not extremists who happened to be Muslim. Their violent actions were motivated by and intended to further their hateful religious views. Denying the Islamic motivation of the attacks - a view actively promoted by the Obama administration and its surrogates - is willful and dangerous blindness to reality.

Mr. …

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Cut off NPR; Public Radio Fires Distinguished Journalist for Recognizing Muslim Threat
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