A Salary Recession for School Administrators? in Addition to the 2009-2010 Salary Survey Data from Educational Research Services, DA Shows How Administrators Are Feeling Their Share of Pain Given the Economic Stranglehold on District Budgets

By Schachter, Ron | District Administration, September 2010 | Go to article overview

A Salary Recession for School Administrators? in Addition to the 2009-2010 Salary Survey Data from Educational Research Services, DA Shows How Administrators Are Feeling Their Share of Pain Given the Economic Stranglehold on District Budgets


Schachter, Ron, District Administration


[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

If you didn't get the raise you were hoping for recently, you're certainly not alone. Almost every day, it seems, school districts coping with budget shortfalls are announcing freezes or cuts to administrative salaries and benefits as part of the solution, a trend that began during the past school year and is becoming more prevalent around the country. Salaries, which account for more than 70 percent of some school budgets, have become a natural target as school boards and superintendents try to inflict minimal damage on student learning.

In Dalton, Ga., the school superintendent's salary plummeted by $14,000 last year in an across-the-board cut for all administrators and teachers in the district. The East Providence (R.I.) School Committee voted this past May to cut the pay of all 29 of the district's administrators by 5 percent for the 2010-2011 school year, and required principals to fund 20 percent of their health insurance costs.

In Los Angeles, administrators across the school system have agreed to wage cuts from 4 to 7 percent, part of the reductions accepted by all of the sprawling district's eight unions for middle-level administrators across the district, in order to avoid the 8,000 layoffs that Superintendent Ramon Cortines forecast without those concessions. With hundreds of administrative positions eliminated in the past few years, those left employed are taking on a mounting workload.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

State governments are also exerting pressure on salaries, as state deficits mount and the public becomes increasingly suspicious of all government spending. Idaho's legislature has mandated a 6.5 percent cut for administrators in the current school year, along with a 4 percent reduction for teachers and other school employees. New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, meanwhile, is waging a high-profile battle with the state's teachers and administrators over pay and benefits. He wants to freeze salaries and to require teachers and administrators to kick in 1.5 percent of their earnings for health insurance. "It's the new reality in New Jersey across all segments of government," says Mike Drewniak, the spokesman for Christie.

This accelerating trend comes as no surprise to the American Association of School Administrators, which has surveyed school districts and is predicting a loss of 275,000 K12 education jobs over the coming year. AASA Executive Director Dan Domenech adds that he has not seen many districts raising salaries at the central office.

"It's very difficult for communities and boards of education not to make reductions in salaries and benefits when there are so many job cuts in schools and when people see what's happening in the private sector," Domenech explains, adding that pay reductions have become the preferred alternative to large-scale layoffs and program cuts.

Lower Pay, Jobs Saved

That preference, says Jim Hawkins, superintendent of the 6,800-student Dalton (Ga.) Public Schools, led to unpaid furlough days for administrators and teachers over the 2009-2010 school year. The process began months earlier as the district was losing millions of dollars in state funding. "I made the rounds to the schools and said, 'Folks, we have a revenue problem and we have to start cutting back.' I got input from employees, and there was a groundswell of, 'Let's preserve jobs and cut pay across the board.'"

"The way we've approached reductions was by contract days [figuring cuts to salary in terms of the days lost], and the ones with the highest pay took the most reductions," Hawkins explains. Even though he was in the middle of a three-year contract, he reduced his paid workdays--along with those of the deputy and assistant superintendents, program directors, and support staff--from 240 to 220. "Ibis turned out to be an 8 percent cut in his salary, from $177,000 to $163,000. The number of furlough days decreased for lesser-paid employees. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

A Salary Recession for School Administrators? in Addition to the 2009-2010 Salary Survey Data from Educational Research Services, DA Shows How Administrators Are Feeling Their Share of Pain Given the Economic Stranglehold on District Budgets
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.