Evil Meets Genius Too Often

Sunshine Coast Sunday (Maroochydore, Australia), October 24, 2010 | Go to article overview

Evil Meets Genius Too Often


IF there is one thing I hate more than voices in my head, it's evil geniuses.

Actually, I don't mind the voices in my head. I find them both entertaining and informative.

But I can't abide evil geniuses.

And there's a few of them around, let me tell you.

You look confused.

You don't understand the concept of "evil genius"?

Remember all those baddies in the Superman and Batman comics Co The Joker, The Penguin, Lex Luthor and so on?

Every one of them was a genius who used his powers for evil.

Hence, evil geniuses.

(Please don't make me explain the concept of comic books. I know none of you are that young).

Now look around and tell me how many people are committed to finding completely evil ways to make your lives a misery.

I'll get the ball rolling and you can join in any time you like.

I firmly believe it was an evil genius who designed the layout of the streets in some of the new suburbs down Caloundra way.

I don't want to upset readers in Bellvista or other places down there but let's be honest, you must have got yourselves lost the first few times you had to negotiate that rabbit warren.

So spare a thought for those of us who go there once a year or so.

We once had to go down there for a kid's third birthday party.

Surprise, surprise, we got so hopelessly lost that by the time we found their house, the young one had left high school and was packing her bags for university.

It's a work of genius because they managed to squeeze all those streets into such a small area.

It's pure evil because there are people who went in there to look at a display home six years ago and still haven't found a way out.

And don't get me started on whoever designed Noosa's road network.

Who else but an evil genius would make every second intersection a bloody roundabout?

I reckon two civil engineers had a bet about who could come up with the most evil road network Co one came up with Bellvista, the other designed Noosa and they called it a draw.

But it's not just road networks that bring out the evil geniuses. …

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