Tracking the Cash in 14th District Money: Funds Flowing in from Washington, D.C., Virginia, California and Minnesota

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), October 24, 2010 | Go to article overview

Tracking the Cash in 14th District Money: Funds Flowing in from Washington, D.C., Virginia, California and Minnesota


Byline: James Fuller jfuller@dailyherald.com

A flood of money from across the country has poured into the 14th Congressional District race, campaign donation reports show.

In one of the most-watched political battles in the nation, incumbent Democrat Bill Foster has raised nearly $3 million in total contributions and Republican Challenger Randy Hultgren has netted $1.2 million.

Third-party challengers Dan Kairis and Doug Marks have not raised enough money to report their contributions. Indeed, both Kairis and Marks have decried the influence of special interests on the major parties as reasons they aren't seeking big donations.

The bulk of the money flowing to both Foster and Hultgren are from individual contributors -- about 79 percent of Hultgren's contributions and 65 percent for Foster. Hultgren received 19 percent of his funds from political action committees and Foster about 30 percent, according to Federal Election Commission reports.

The special interests

represented in those PAC donations is representative of historical trends. The financial sector is by far the

largest industry represented in donations to Foster and Hultgren and candidates across the nation, according to a breakdown from OpenSecrets.org. That sector may be even more interested in the 14th Congressional District than many Congressional seats because Foster sits on the Financial Services Committee.

Reflecting that, the financial sector poured more

than $400,000 into Foster's campaign coffers, compared to about $120,000 for Hultgren.

That money is not solely based in Illinois for either Foster or Hultgren.

Looking at just the most recent quarterly report, Foster received donations from 36 different states. Hultgren received donations from 29 states. …

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