Theme for This Issue: Special Needs/gifted and Talented

By Fairhall, Anne | NATE Classroom, Autumn 2010 | Go to article overview

Theme for This Issue: Special Needs/gifted and Talented


Fairhall, Anne, NATE Classroom


The more we discussed possible articles for this issue, the more sensible it seemed that we were looking at both of these areas at the same time, considering them side by side. It's a moot point as to whether the words we use for the categories here are benign; many people deplore the way that they can lead to embarrassment and resentment. But all teachers have to nurture aspiration and allay frustration, and deploy resources where they seem to be most effective. So, in these pages you'll find a wide variety of views from both corners, with very different angles and a range of attitudes.

Julie Blake tackles the issue of naming the parts head on by asking 'Can anyone be gifted?', a reflection on her own experience of English teaching in residential Gifted and Talented education, and offers some useful advice (page 11). There is an article by Mark Roberts which describes how planning for English teaching and learning at a special school has deepened his thinking and honed his teaching skills (page 8); whilst Peter Shaw outlines how a group of his own students ended up as published writers with their work in high street bookshops (page 50). Peter Thomas shows how tackling provision for Gifted and Talented can be subverted to the cause of all students, in all classrooms (page 16). The National Literacy Trust and the National Association for Special Education Needs have contributed interesting reports about their own forthcoming projects and Stuart Scott gives some excellent advice about teaching English as an additional language (page 36). …

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