Barrington Stoke Books: Inspiring Reluctant Readers

By Thomson, Patience | NATE Classroom, Autumn 2010 | Go to article overview

Barrington Stoke Books: Inspiring Reluctant Readers


Thomson, Patience, NATE Classroom


Barrington Stoke books help every child to love reading. They publish for reluctant, dyslexic and struggling readers--kids who find reading difficult, or who aren't yet ready to cope with long books, or who simply don't enjoy books.

Barrington Stoke was founded by Lucy Juckes and myself with very clear aims and objectives. Its books were to fill a particular gap in the market. When, far later than their contemporaries, the struggling readers at last reached a level where they could read 'real' books, there was nothing out there to tempt them. Books with the right interest age were too hard. Those with easily accessible text were too babyish in content. Inspiring books were needed to bridge the gap. So Lucy and I embarked on a challenging publishing venture.

Lucy, who had run the marketing department for Bloomsbury publishers, had all the essential skills to set up and run the company. I was formerly principal at Eairley House school and was responsible for ensuring that the books were on target. After many years of involvement with children with reading problems, I was well aware of the amount of professional expertise that was available in the field. Not only teachers, but speech and language therapists, psychologists, occupational therapists and even orthoptists had strong ideas as to how books could be made more accessible and more attractive for the less able reader. The children themselves could articulate their preferences and needs with surprising accuracy, yet this great store of knowledge was largely untapped and certainly not co-ordinated. Individual ideas were not necessarily original but the combination of so many of them worked miracles. Remove all stones and hazards from the path and the fledgling cyclist will ride off in triumph. And reading, like cycling, is a skill that once learnt is never forgotten.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

The stories are written by some of the most famous and best-loved children's authors around. Stories that hook you from the first page. Stories that grab you and don't let go. Stories that make you want to carry on reading.

When a reader is hooked on a story, his or her reading ability improves. A child who wants to read on will read more fluently and have fewer problems understanding difficult words--because he wants to read on! That's why books for reluctant readers have to have fabulous stories. They need other things too--the presentation and the language level are vital, and Barrington Stoke use a variety of carefully tested methods to make books easier and more accessible for reluctant and struggling readers.

But in the end, it all comes down to the story. Barrington Stoke books are never dumbed-down or patronising. They are compelling stories that children enjoy reading, they are very accessible so that readers build up their confidence, and they look and have great covers so good that nobody feels embarrassed reading them. There is nothing on the covers to suggest that the books are for reluctant readers. Every detail matters:

* Barrington Stoke uses their own font, Barrington Stoke Roman, which was specially designed by language specialists. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Barrington Stoke Books: Inspiring Reluctant Readers
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.