Let's Get Whizzy!

By Cutter, Clare | NATE Classroom, Autumn 2010 | Go to article overview

Let's Get Whizzy!


Cutter, Clare, NATE Classroom


We all know that a typical primary class can be somewhat disparate with students at all stages of ability and with all sorts of talents. At one end of the scale there are SEN children who sometimes struggle with basic concepts of literacy and numeracy, whilst at the other end, there will be gifted and talented children in need of higher order thinking tasks, divergent questioning and constant challenges.

It is therefore essential that the modern practitioner is effectively equipped to teach across this wide range of ability. Within a single lesson there needs to be coherence and continuity whilst allowing access to the weakest student and stimulus for the very gifted.

Teachit Primary's whizzy interactive whiteboard resources on the site provide fun and engaging opportunities to support and challenge students of all abilities. As children first enter school some take to reading like ducklings to water while for others, navigating the complexities of the English language mean a long and frustrating struggle. Fab-Phonics is an invaluable interactive whiteboard resource which helps children develop their phonological awareness through sound recognition and building CVC words in a fun way. The quirky animation and 'gaming' aspect of this resource makes it particularly appealing to all those lively boys out there! On the flip side this resource is a great activity for groups of more able children within the foundation stage who can work independently to complete the games.

A new interactive phonics resource is coming soon to Teachit Primary. Stretch is designed to help children develop the phonic skills that will enable them to reach a higher level of reading and spelling. …

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