Extract


The extract on the following pages comes from Dear Dylan, one Df the books short-listed for the YoungMinds Book Award 2010.

YoungMinds is a UK national charity committed to improving the mental health and emotional well-being of all children and young people. Established n 2003, the annual book award--sponsored by Booktrust--seeks to raise awareness and create understanding of mental health needs of children and young people.

The Book Award runs alongside the annual lecture and has become Young Minds main public relations event. A ceremony and reception are held in central London in November/December for YoungMinds' supporters who include key figures from the children and young people's mental health sector, allied charities, politicians and policy makers as well as the publishing industry.

The other books selected for the 2010 long list are:

* Desperate Measures, by Laura Summers (Piccadilly)

* Ember Fury, by Cathy Brett (Headline)

* Ice Lolly, by Jean Ure (Harper Collins Children's Books)

* Inside, by J A Jarman (Andersen press)

* Lottie Biggs is not Desperate, by Hayley Long (Macmillan Children's Books)

* No Way To Go, by Bernard Ashley, (Hachette)

* Running on the Cracks, by Julia Donaldson (Egmont)

* Them and Us, by Bali Rai (Barrington Stoke)

* The Truth about Leo, by David Yelland (Penguin)

* When I was Joe, by Keren David (Frances Lincoln Children's Books)

* Zellah Green, by Vanessa Curtis (Egmont)

Part One E-Mates

From: georgieharris@hotmail.com

To: info@dylancurtland.com

Subject: Love

Date: Monday 1st May 16:05

Dear Dylan

Oh my God, this feels really weird, writing you an email as if I know you or something! But the thing is, I really feel as if I do know you. And--here goes--I love you. I know we haven't met or anything, but sometimes when I watch you in Jessop Close I feel as if you're talking just to me. I mean, I know you're not really talking just to me. I know there are 7.6 million other viewers you're talking to too. If I thought you were talking just to me well, I'd be a bit of a weirdo mentalist (as my best friend Jessica R. Bailey would say) and I'm not a weirdo mentalist, honest. It's just that sometimes when you're arguing with your parents, or when you confide in Mark or Kez, the things you say, well, it's as if you're speaking my own private thoughts. Does that make sense? Probably not. But what I'm trying to say is that I understand. I know what it's like to be an outsider. And it's only when I watch you in Jessop Close and you say the things you do that I don't feel so completely alone. Because at least I know that someone else out there feels the same way as me. I know you're an actor, and my absolute fave actor by the way. The other girls at school all love Jeremy Bridges but I'm sorry, he's just a snoron if you ask me. I think you ought to know that I like to make up new words. A snoron is a moron who is so boring he makes you want to snore. You are way more interesting than Jeremy Bridges and at least you aren't going out with a supermodel who thinks it's smart to get out of cars wearing no knickers when they know there are going to be loads of photographers around. Just out of interest, are you going out with anyone right now? But anyway, as I was saying, I know you're an actor and the things you say are all part of a script, but it's the way you say them. You couldn't be that convincing if you didn't really understand what it felt like. Could you?

I hope I didn't shock you when I said that I loved you. It's just that I was watching Oprah this morning and she said that we should all tell each other we love each other a whole lot more. She said the world would be a much better place and there wouldn't be wars and terrorism and stuff if we did. We're not supposed to tell everyone of course, there is NO WAY I would tell my scummy stepdad that I loved him because that would be lying and I don't think Oprah would want that. …

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