Tweet Patrol: Deploying Social Networks to Solve Public Safety Issues

By Tucker, Patrick | The Futurist, November-December 2010 | Go to article overview

Tweet Patrol: Deploying Social Networks to Solve Public Safety Issues


Tucker, Patrick, The Futurist


A group of researchers in the United Kingdom are using the power of social networks and location broadcasting to make cities safer. The program, Voice Your View, allows pedestrians to record their opinions about their surroundings into a database via their mobile phones or strategically situated kiosks. The data is then shared with both city planners and the public via Web sites and at the public spaces themselves.

Voice Your View bears a slight resemblance to the popular location-based marketing service Foursquare, which rewards users with points and coupons for "checking in" with their phones at various venues and commercial establishments around the city. But the Voice Your View program solicits real-time data from residents and visitors about areas that need improvement.

"A key focus area of the project is people's perceptions about crime," says chief investigator Jon Whittle of Lancaster University. He reports that Voice Your View has analysis and artificial intelligence components not available in other commercial services like Twitter and Foursquare. The program surpasses the capabilities of many other social networks. It analyzes the body of data collected at any given point and organizes comments by theme, sentiment, and how easily the problem being reported can be solved. Voice Your View actually connects users to one another and to planners.

"We match up users based on what they are talking about, and we are experimenting with matching users with opposing views so as to break down barriers and start a conversation," says Whittle.

The research team has conducted public trials in Lancaster, England, with 600 users, and a semi-public trial in the town of Derry. They also have an upcoming trial in Coventry.

Location-based Internet services like this will change city life in the next few decades in a number of ways, according to researchers exploring geographic information system (GIS) solutions. Key barriers remain, such as building out fiber-optic infrastructure to allow for greater system capability, getting citizens who are vulnerable but not technically inclined--like the elderly--to use the systems, and getting policy makers to give importance to the data. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Tweet Patrol: Deploying Social Networks to Solve Public Safety Issues
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.