Forget Vampires - Werewolves Are Leading the Pack; VAMPIRES Have Been Done to Death, Says Writer Steve Feasey. Werewolves Are His Thing, as DAVID WHETSTONE Finds Out

The Journal (Newcastle, England), November 3, 2010 | Go to article overview

Forget Vampires - Werewolves Are Leading the Pack; VAMPIRES Have Been Done to Death, Says Writer Steve Feasey. Werewolves Are His Thing, as DAVID WHETSTONE Finds Out


Byline: DAVID WHETSTONE

HALLOWEEN may have been last weekend's craze but they are having a horror hangover at Seven Stories this weekend when werewolf author Steve Feasey takes up residence.

That's not to say Steve is a werewolf - although obviously you can never be quite sure - but the snarling critters are the stars of his Changeling series of novels for young readers.

They are quite new to the bookshops. The first one appeared as recently as January 2009 but with four now out and one to come, Steve has established himself as a storyteller able to hook in reluctant readers - namely, teenage boys.

Steve will be at Seven Stories to talk about the latest Changeling book, Demon Games, but no doubt fans will be curious about the series as a whole.

"They're about a 14-year-old boy who wakes up in the care home he lives in and discovers he's a werewolf," explains Steve, who lives in Hertfordshire with his wife and children, a girl aged 13 and a boy of nine.

"He had his first change the night before but doesn't remember much about it."

The boy is called Trey Laporte, a name which you imagine would set him apart from the crowd.

Steve says he knows that Bernard Laporte is a French rugby coach but that wasn't it.

"I'm not always sure where names come from but a good one can come out of left field and hit you on the forehead sometimes."

On his own website Steve says he grew up on a council estate in Hertfordshire which he hated at the time although he reckons it might have given him "a good grounding in life".

He attended "a truly awful secondary school" which has now closed down. "Looking back," he writes, "I think I was quite an unhappy kid, particularly in my teenage years. I never felt that I truly fitted."

As far as writing is concerned, Steve describes himself as a late starter. "I worked in the photographic industry for a long time, managing a technical team that worked with professional photographers a lot.

"I saw a lot of pictures and I think that helped with the writing. I'm quite a visual writer in that I tend to see things in my head and then transcribe them on to paper."

Steve set up his own company and shortly afterwards decided he'd have a go at writing.

"I've always got a book in my hand.

I love books and I love stories but I'd never really thought about writing seriously. "Then I was watching a programme on TV about how a lot of the books I used to read as a teenager, classic action adventure stories by people like Robert Louis Stevenson and Kipling, were starting to disappear. …

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Forget Vampires - Werewolves Are Leading the Pack; VAMPIRES Have Been Done to Death, Says Writer Steve Feasey. Werewolves Are His Thing, as DAVID WHETSTONE Finds Out
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