Pull the Plug on Obamacare; Health Care Takeover Law Needs Scrapping, Not Tweaking

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), November 5, 2010 | Go to article overview

Pull the Plug on Obamacare; Health Care Takeover Law Needs Scrapping, Not Tweaking


Byline: THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Obamacare quickly emerged as the first major issue of the congressional transition. The president says tweak

it. We say scrap it.

As was widely predicted, Obamacare turned out to be a quick retirement plan for the moderate Democrats who were strong-armed into supporting it. The GOP tidal wave did not buoy the fortunes of Rep. Anh Joseph Cao, the only Republican who cast a vote supporting the health care bill, who also lost his seat. A number of pre- and post-election polls showed that Obamacare was not the electoral elixir that Democratic congressional leaders promised a year ago. A USA Today-Gallup survey on the public's priorities for the new Congress listed repealing health care law one point behind cutting federal spending. In a Reuters-Ipsos poll on issues for Congress in 2011, 53 percent listed health care reform as crucial and 41 percent said it was important. A pre-election Pew Research Center survey showed health care as the second-most-important issue to voters after the job situation. And a CBS News exit poll showed that 48 percent of those who voted said Obamacare should be repealed and just 16 percent thought it should be left alone.

Democrats who survived the red tide seem not to have heard this particular message from the voters. President Obama and reprieved Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid both said the law could be tweaked, but they oppose any extensive reconstructive surgery. Mr. Obama oddly said he did not want to relitigate the issue, though the legal challenges to the law are just beginning. Future judicial rulings may eviscerate Obamacare and force the matter back to the legislature, but the new Congress should not wait for the courts to take action.

The most odious aspects of Obamacare are yet to hit. …

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Pull the Plug on Obamacare; Health Care Takeover Law Needs Scrapping, Not Tweaking
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